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April 2015

Analysing online and place-based spaces for networked learning, a Research on Learning and Educational Innovation seminar with Lucila Carvalho.

Lucila.jpgMost research in networked learning has been in higher education and in workplace settings. As technology evolves and becomes more pervasive, and new mobile devices, media habits and social networking practices emerge, attention to other types of (formal and informal) spaces for networked learning becomes necessary. There is also an increased need for analytical tools to support educational designers cope with the complexity of these emerging assemblages of people, things, ideas and experiences.

This seminar discusses analysis and design for networked learning, presenting some of the ideas in The Architecture of Productive Learning Networks (Carvalho & Goodyear 2014), and work developed in the Laureate Program of Professor Peter Goodyear. It illustrates how the activity-centered analysis and design (ACAD) framework was used as the basis for analysing relations between the educational design and the activity of participants in three very distinct learning networks. The three examples comprise one formal and two informal

Lucila Carvalho is a postdoctoral research associate in the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) at the University of Sydney. She works on Professor Peter Goodyear’s Laureate Fellowship program: "Learning, technology and design: architectures for productive networked learning". She has presented her work at various international conferences in the fields of education, sociology, systemic functional linguistics, design and software engineering. She was co-editor of The Architecture of Productive Learning Networks (Routledge, 2014) and the forthcoming book Place-based Spaces for Networked Learning.

When: May 6, 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Room 612 in the Education Building A35
More information available here
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/.

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation seminar with Roberto Martinez-Maldonado. Note change of venue to room 221 for this seminar only.

This seminar fuses research on CSCL and collaborative design for learning. It reports a study located in a novel multi-surface environment, configured to support small teams who are designing for other people’s learning. From observational and interview data, we show how collaborative design for learning needs to be understood as a complex, multiply-situated activity, in which design problem-solving, tools and space usage depend on the fluent deployment of intuitive knowledge about mutual awareness, shared perception, information persistence and movement.

Roberto267.jpegRoberto Martinez-Maldonado is a postdoctoral research associate on the ARC Laureate Fellowship at CoCo. He finished his PhD in 2014 in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group (CHAI) at the University of Sydney. His research area is Human-Computer Interaction, with a particular emphasis on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Educational Data Mining. His research interests are broad and varied.

When: April 29, 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Design Studio, room 221 (note change of venue for this week's seminar only) in the Education Building A35
More information available here

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday seminar with Dr Boris Handal.

Dr Boris Handal is an associate professor in educational technologies at the University of Notre Dame Australia. He has taught in schools and universities for over thirty years in Australia, Asia and Latin America. Last year he was invited as a Visiting Professor by the University of Alberta to study the implementation of digital technologies in schools in North America.

During 2014 Boris visited thirty educational sites and interviewed over 100 eminent teachers, principals, district superintendents and academics in the United States, Canada and Australia countries to study the implementation of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets in teaching and learning. During that period evidence and exemplars on issues that currently challenge educators worldwide such as modern pedagogies, digital citizenship, institutional change, equity and professional learning were collected. His upcoming book “Mobile Makes Learning Free” provides new conceptual frameworks to understand best practice in the field of mobile learning.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm (arrive at 10.45am for refreshments)
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/
More information at http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/implementing-mobile-learning-in-schools.

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday Seminar with David Ashe.

DA100.jpg

When students are asked to think about aspects of ‘sustainability’ they are required not only to understand scientific facts but also to consider that they are both part of the 'problem' and part of the 'solution'. These issues are inherently ill-structured; that is, they may have many viable alternative solutions and it can be difficult to know when a satisfactory solution has been reached. This seminar presents a PhD study that investigated upper primary school students knowledge and thinking as they considered issues related to sustainability. The study focused on how knowledge was used across different contexts and draws conclusions about the use of ‘epistemic challenges’ as a pedagogical tool.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
Arrive at 10.45am for refreshment
More information at Epistemic challenges in inquiry science.

David Ashe is a member of the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. He has just competed his PhD and currently works as part of a team of researchers investigating how to design better tools and resources for networked online learning.

This seminar is one of our regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Seminars: the Wednesday Seminars (formerly the CoCo/STL seminars) this year. Please note our new location is room 612. More information is available on our website.


A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday Seminar with Kate Thompson and Pippa Yeoman.

As the collection of ‘big data’ (in terms of both depth and breadth) becomes more common, it will become increasingly important to adopt methods for sharing data, analysing common datasets, and making comparisons across studies. In this study of high-school students engaged in a collaborative design task about a local environmental issue, we adopted a multimodal approach, which allowed us to untangle the interplay of epistemic and social activity, negotiation of tools, and the physical and digital setting that typify such environments, allowing us to find explanations for the very different achievements of the learners. Researchers often lack the language to properly convey the activity observed in complex learning environments. We have begun to do this in a way that respects the design of the task, can be related to the learning outcomes, and gives value to the activity of the learners.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
Arrive at 10.45am for refreshment
More information at A multimodal method for analysing complex learning environment

This is the second of the regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Seminars: the Wednesday Seminars (formerly the CoCo/STL seminars) this year. Please note our new location is room 612. More information is available on our website.


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Research by the University's Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI).
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