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May 2016

Join us on June 15 for a Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) Wednesday seminar; "Enhancing workplace learning through mobile technology, with Professor Franziska Trede.

Trede267.jpgWorkplace learning and technology-mediated learning are two key foci for university education. Unfortunately, they often remain separate discourses and practices, even though their integration could provide important opportunities to bridge education and work contexts and build students’ digital capacities; on- and offline professional identities; and technology-mediated work practices. In this 90-minute workshop, participants will learn about the two-year multi-site research project “Enhancing workplace learning through mobile technology", which has been funded by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching and is being led by Charles Sturt University, in collaboration with The University of Sydney, Western Sydney University and Deakin University.

Lead researcher Professor Franziska Trede will also outline the processes used to develop mobile resources for learning in workplace settings. Participants will trial a set of resources, share their ideas and feedback and, hopefully, develop a better understanding of the possibilities and challenges of effectively using mobile technology to enrich learning experiences on placement. This workshop will outline the theoretical foundations of the project, and draw on preliminary findings aimed at helping students, academics and workplace placement educators make better use of personal, mobile technologies to connect learning and work. It will workshop an emerging mobile technology capacity-building framework and its resources and design patterns and how they could be translated into course specific resources

Project website ttp://www.csu.edu.au/efpi/wpltech
Project blog https://wpltech.wordpress.com

The CRLI Wednesday seminars (formerly CoCo and STL) run on most Wednesdays in semester and host local and international experts who present research on learning and educational innovation in an informal setting.

Event details
• When: 11.30am to 1.00pm on 15 June 2016. This is a brown bag event, you are welcome to bring your lunch to eat.
• Where: Room 612 Education Building A35
• This seminar will not be available online or recorded.
• More information here.

Join us on June for a Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) Wednesday seminar; "The Local Games Lab: Grassroots engagement with games, learning, mobile, and place, with Associate Professor Chris Holden.

Holden.jpgBecause videogames are complex media properties, their design and use in the name of learning has been often limited to researchers and publishers of significant means. More recently however, new tools and changes to the world at large - especially the near ubiquitous adoption of smartphones - have opened up new, more accessible avenues. Games can become something much more akin to vernacular. However, hardware and software are not the only obstacles to meaningful change. It is necessary to rethink our assumptions and traditions regarding who gets to be in the driver’s seat, and develop participatory models of research, implementation, and interpretation.

One such model is a Local Games Lab—a name for what happens when early adopters can develop experience and expertise to recruit and support diverse participation in game design and use locally. The name also refers to the dimension of place as a strong organizing principle allowing us to bring together diverse stakeholders and an area of game design that may be only ever entertained outside the commercial mainstream. By learning how to grow and sustain game development and use within individual communities, we may be able to reach more than enthusiasts and institutions, and greatly increase the capacity for many to see games as general tools for expression and purpose.

Since 2008, I have been involved in educational game design myself at UNM and recruited other faculty, students, and community members into the mix as a way to help them achieve their own ambitions through design: The Local Games Lab ABQ. We have developed a tradition of exploration, development, and sharing though we lack the institutional or economic resources to establish and organize such a “center”. In this talk I’d like to share some the history of the Local Games Lab ABQ: our projects and their aims, but also how our local work connects us to themes that extend beyond the provincial: how games, place, and learning comes together in augmented reality, how tools like ARIS—an open-source, easy-to-use augmented reality platform—have both enabled us to create and make use of games and to contribute back to the emerging affinity spaces of those exploring game design for learning across many locales.

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Join us on May 11 for a Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) Wednesday seminar; "Conceptualizing Debates in Learning and Educational Research: Towards a Complex Systems Conceptual Framework of Learning, with Professor Michael J. Jacobson and Professor Peter Reimann.

This seminar provides an overview of a paper, just published by Educational Psychologist, that proposes a conceptual framework of learning based on perspectives and methodologies being employed in the study of complex physical and social systems to inform educational research.

We argue that the contexts in which learning occurs are complex systems with elements or agents at different levels—including neuronal, cognitive, intrapersonal, interpersonal, cultural—in which there are feedback interactions within and across levels of the systems so that collective properties arise (i.e., emerge) from the behaviors of the parts, often with properties that are not individually exhibited by those parts. We analyze the long running cognitive versus situative learning debate and propose that a complex systems conceptual framework of learning (CSCFL) provides a principled way to achieve a theoretical rapprochement. We conclude with a consideration of more general implications of the CSCFL for educational theory and research.

Michael J. Jacobson, Ph.D., is a Professor and Chair of Education in the Faculty of Education and Social Work, a Honorary Associate in the School of Medical Sciences, and Co-Director of the Learning, Cognition, and Brain Research Group at the University of Sydney. Peter Reimann, Ph.D., is a Professor of Education at University of Sydney and co-director of the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation.

The CRLI Wednesday seminars (formerly CoCo and STL) run on most Wednesdays in semester and host local and international experts who present research on learning and educational innovation in an informal setting.

Event details
• When: 11.30am to 1.00pm on 11 May 2016. This is a brown bag event, you are welcome to bring your lunch to eat.
• Where: Room 612 Education Building A35
• This seminar will not be available online or recorded.
• More information here.

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Research by the University's Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI).
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