Blog home

Event

Nancy.png Louise.png

Two presenters juxtapose their projects to highlight new insights into research involving school-university partnerships.

Self-Directed Learning in Science, by Prof. Nancy Law, The University of Hong Kong.
This is a University-School Project that focuses on network-based capacity building and knowledge co-creation on learning and assessment design, as well as architecture for learning for scalable innovation.

Thinking Like Scientists by Dr Louise Sutherland, leader of I-Science program, The University of Sydney.
This project examines how different participants (scientists, science teachers, teacher educators and preservice science teachers) value aspects of a science-based artifact produced by high school students.

Read more...

howdodata.jpeg

Professor Peter Reimann

The widespread availability of learner-related data has the potential to empower students, teachers, parents and school leaders by providing critical insights into the learning process. However, fostering a culture of data-informed learning and teaching in schools remains a significant challenge. This is in part due to capacity: Teachers are by and large not prepared for advanced data practices, and teacher education providers are currently not well prepared to develop that capacity. Research on developing data literacy for teachers, research so far has focussed mainly on three aspects: 1) analysis of the components that make up this literacy, 2) analysis of existing teacher education programs, and 3) studies on professional development programs conducted with in-service teachers. After an overview of the state of the art, I will address questions regarding What to learn and How to learn about data literacy in more detail, focusing on pre-service teacher education because very little is known at this stage about how to design for and support the learning of education students.

Event details
When: Wed April 12, 2017, 11.30am– 1.00pm (this is a brown bag seminar, attendees are welcome to bring their lunch)
Where: Room 612, Education Building A35
This seminar will not be available online or recorded.
No need to RSVP, just come on the day.

Reimann.jpg

What are the benefits of providing peer feedback (online) and how can it be made even stronger?

Questions of effectiveness and quality of peer feedback and peer assessment have been very actively discussed from the perspective of the receiver of feedback, however the benefits for the provider of feedback messages have received much less attention, at least in Higher Education. But the benefits could be substantial: The process of peer feedback engages students actively in learning, helps develop self-management and judgment, strengthens the capacity for self-assessment, helps develop subject knowledge, enables students to receive feedback faster and promotes social interaction.

Understanding the benefits to the student providing the feedback is becoming more important as the opportunities for engaging in peer tutoring and peer assessment practices explode in the online space. In addition to designed peer learning practices we need to consider informal peer help and peer tutoring episodes.

Peter will give an overview of recent research on the online provision of peer feedback in relation to research on peer feedback and peer tutoring more generally. He will speculate on how learning benefits for the student provider of online feedback might be increased, based on explanatory models for the learning from teaching effect. He’ll end with some thoughts on how technology can help, not only with providing peer feedback, but with the learning that arises from providing feedback.

Prof. Peter Reimann is the co-Director of the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) at the University of Sydney, (formerly the CoCo Research Centre), in addition to having continued involvement in European Commission funded projects in IT research and development for learning. His primary research areas include cognitive learning with a focus on educational computing and the development of evaluation and assessment methods for the effectiveness of computer-based technologies. Current research includes the analysis of individual and group problem solving/learning processes and possible support by means of ICT, and analysis of the use of mobile IT in informal learning settings (outdoors, in museums, etc.).

Event details:

7 April 2017
12 – 1pm
Room 218, Level 2 South,
Fisher Library
REGISTER ONLINE at https://sydney.edu.au/education-portfolio/ei/events/

Events3.jpg

At CRLI, we run a weekly seminar series hosting local and international experts who present research on learning and educational innovation in an informal setting. Seminars run on most Wednesdays in semester.

Upcoming seminars in 2017:
A glance of this year's seminar
12-Apr-2017—Peter Reimann
26-Apr-2017—Andrew Martin
3-May-2017—Kate Thompson
17-May-2017—Andrew Gibson
24-May-2017—Deborah Richards
31-May-2017—Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick
7-Jun-2017—Learning Analytics Research Group (LARG)
14-Jun-2017—Rachel Wilson
28-Jun-2017—Maria Souza e Silva
2-Aug-2017—Louise Sutherland
9-Aug-2017—Nick Hopwood
20-Sep-2017—Tom Carey
4-Oct-2017—James Dalziel
1-Nov-2017—Learning Analytics Research Group

Please note we are in room 612 of the Education Building. We are always looking for more speakers, topics and ideas. If you would like to suggest a seminar topic, propose a speaker (including yourself) or provide feedback, we would love to hear from you at crli.info@sydney.edu.au.

When: Wednesdays, 11.30am. Seminars usually run for an hour followed by a 30min Q&A session.
Where: Rm 612 of the Education bldg. (Unless otherwise specified in the seminar's description page).
Brown bag: You are welcome to bring your lunch to these events.

Register now for Friday's Teaching@Sydney event - Overcoming the Trump effect: What to do with misconceived but highly confident learners?

DSC_2663_Jason_Lodge_sq.jpg

Confidence has been linked to better career outcomes, happiness and a greater likelihood of attracting a suitable partner. However, confidence has a dark side that is overconfidence. Overconfidence is particularly a problem in relation to commonly held misconceptions. Here one might expect that overconfidence always interferes with learning from our mistakes but this is not always the case. It seems that we are more likely to remember an error if we were initially confident we were correct, compared to errors resulting from a guess. This hypercorrection effect has been attributed to attentional enhancement as a result of a mismatch between confidence in a response and its actual correctness. In other words we learn when we are surprised.

In this seminar Dr Jason M Lodge, psychological scientist, Senior Lecturer in the Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education and a Senior Research Fellow in Learning Sciences in the Australian Research Council funded Science of Learning Research Centre at the University of Melbourne, will present an overview of research on the hypercorrection effect and discuss how it might prove useful in a higher education context. Jason’s research focuses on the application of the learning sciences to higher education and the ways in which technology is influencing learning. Jason is also co-editor (with Jared Cooney Horvath and John Hattie) of From the Laboratory to the Classroom (Routledge, 2016) and Associate Editor of Australasian Journal of Educational Technology.

:: When: 26 August 2016 12.00pm – 1.00pm
:: Where: New Law School Lecture Theatre 024
:: Cost: Free
:: More information and registration at http://sydney.edu.au/education-portfolio/ei/teaching@sydney/seminar-overcoming-trump-effect-misconceived-highly-confident-learners/

On 11 March 2016, Sydney Ideas presents A Scientific Approach to Teaching Science and Engineering with Nobel Laureate, Professor Carl Wieman.

This talk is co-presented with the Charles Perkins Centre Science of Learning Science Node

professor_carl_wieman_thumb.jpgGuided by experimental tests of theory and practice, science and engineering have advanced rapidly in the past 500 years. Guided primarily by tradition and dogma, science education meanwhile has remained largely medieval. Research on how people learn is now revealing much more effective ways to teach, learn, and evaluate learning than what is in use in the traditional science class.

The combination of this research with information technology is setting the stage for a new approach to teaching and learning that can provide the relevant and effective science education for all students that is needed for the 21st century. Although the focus of the talk is on undergraduate science teaching, where the data is the most compelling, the underlying principles come from studies of the general development of expertise and apply widely.

This talk is presented by Professor Carl Wieman, Department of Physics and Graduate School of Education, Stanford University and Nobel Laureate. More information and registration at this page.

Date: : Friday 11 March, 2016
Time: 4.30 to 6pm
Venue: Charles Perkins Centre Auditorium, Johns Hopkins Drive, the University of Sydney.
Cost: Free and open to all with online registration requested
Registration: Register online at this page.

RSVP now to attend a March 4th Sydney Ideas talk with Professor George Siemens, Director of the LINK Research Lab at the University of Texas, Arlington, titled "Neuroscience and Learning Analytics: a historic leap in understanding learning?".

This talk is co-presented with the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) Portfolio at the University of Sydney

The past decade has solidified and advanced two important tracks in helping researchers understand learning: neuroscience and big data. Sophisticated imaging techniques allow insight into the functioning of the human brain that was until recently unimaginable. Small controlled studies are laying a foundation for a new science of learning.

In contrast, big data, often generated in technological environments, presents researchers with fuzzier and messier data than what is common in neuroscience. The large N, however, offers tantalising insights into the social, affective, and meta-cognitive aspects of learning as it happens in authentic work and school settings.

This presentation will explore the methodological differences that underpin the neuroscience and big data (learning analytics) frameworks of learning research and suggest ways in which they might contribute to future educational models.

This talk is free and open to all, with online registration requested.


  • When: March 4th, 3.00pm - 4.00pm

  • Where: Law School Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue, The University of Sydney

  • More information and RSVP online


The Sciences and Technologies of Learning (STL) Research Fest was held in the Charles Perkins Centre Hub on Thurs Nov 5th 2015. Posters and abstracts from the day are available online in a Dropbox folder at http://bit.ly/STLFest15files.

Congratulations to our poster winners at the Research Fest:

JUDGES’ CHOICE
Winner – Yobelli Jimenez and Sarah Lewis, Implementation of immersive virtual technology for radiation therapy education (link to external Dropbox file).
Runner-Up - Ling Wu, Enhancing Young Children’s Empathy Development through Purposely Designed Educational Tablet Games (link to external Dropbox file).

PEOPLE’S CHOICE
Winner - Dr David Ashe and Melinda Lewis, Context in Flux: An invitation to join a think-aloud installation at Research Fest (link to blog post).

Thank you to our poster judges; Sonya Corcoran and Julie King. Posters will be made available online in the next week. Details will be posted here, on our website, and to fest registrants.

On November 5, the STL Research Fest will bring together the wider community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to exchange ideas and form new collaborations.

Timetable

Start End Item
9:45 9:55 Registration
10:00 10:40 Opening and shorter plenary
10:40 11:00 Morning Tea
11:00 11:45 Parallel session 1
11:45 12:30 Poster showcase 1
12:30 13:15 Lunch
13:15 14:00 Poster showcase 2
14:00 14:45 Parallel session 2
14:45 15:00 Refreshments
15:00 16:00 Plenary and closing - Learning to work across boundaries - opportunities for research and innovation

Parallel sessions

ID Title Presenters/discussants
Parallel session 1 : 11.00-11:45am
1 Mind the gap Abelardo Pardo, Michael Jacobson, Peter Reimann, Kalina Yacef
2 Teaching how to work across boundaries Lina Markauskaite, Peter Goodyear, Marie Carroll, Tina Hinton, Philip Poronnik, Kim Bell-Anderson, Simon Poon
3 Coding, designing and networking Rob Saunders, Lucila Carvalho
Parallel session 2 : 14.00-14:45
4 Researching Innovative Learning Spaces Rob Ellis, Tina Hinton, Pippa Yeoman
5 Professional learning on-the-go Lina Markauskaite, James Edwards, Meg Phelps, Peter Goodyear
6 Cranking up a notch Adam Bridgeman, Wai Yat Wong, Rena Bokosmaty, Meloni Muir

Posters

Poster Session 1: 11.45 – 12.30. Posters 1-14      

Poster Session 2: 13.15-14.00. Posters 15-27     

  1. Undergraduates as App development partners: a case study from Botany & Computer Science. Alexander Ling, Ahmed Shadid, Michael Johnston, Xilin Huang, Woo Yang Baeg, Scott Dong, Se-Hyun Kevin Ahn, Caroline Cheung, Satyendra Sinha, Rosanne Quinnell
  2. Group Formation - How do students' characteristics and behaviour affect group work performance? Augusto Dias Pereira dos Santos, Kalina Yacef
  3. A proposal for redesigning problem-based learning in medical education: Contrasting student solutions and improving consolidation. Alisha Portolese, Michael Jacobson, Robbert Duvivier, Lina Markauskaite
  4. EQ Clinic: An Online Clinic for Medical Communication Enhancement. Chunfeng Liu
  5. Exercise motivation through fully-immersive gamified virtual reality experience. Crystal Yoo
  6. Investigating the development of scientific inquiry in undergraduate physics students. Gabriel Nguyen, John O'Byrne, Manjula Sharma
  7. Learning and Enactment in Techno-human ecosystem: Embodiment of sociomateriality in sensemaking process. Gilbert Importante, Dr. Lina Markauskaite, Prof. Peter Goodyear
  8. A Student ‘Vision Statement’ as a Catalyst for Educational Innovation in Navitas: Towards the ideal technology-enabled learning environment for English Language Students. Jonathan Hvaal
  9. What offline and online technologies do higher education students use to complete assessment tasks? Lynnette Lounsbury, Dr David Bolton, Dr Paula Mildenhall, Assoc. Prof. Maria Northcote
  10. Learning by enhanced tactile feedback - Montessori sandpaper extended, Michael Tang, Dr. Paul Ginns
  11. Visualising socio-material practices in knowledge creation. Natalie Spence
  12. Clinical development using reflective learning and ePortfolios: staff and student perceptions. Punyanit Rungnava
  13. A quantitative study of students’ experiences, needs and expectations around technology in their personal lives and study in Higher Education, VET and ELICOS contexts. Lucy Blakemore, Yindta Whittington
  14. Mirror, mirror: A pre-learning exercise enhances mathematical problem-solving efficiency. Eleni Smyrnis, Paul Ginns
  15. How collaborative successes and failures become productive: An exploration of emerging understanding and misunderstanding turning points in model-based learning with productive failure. Alisha Portolese, Lina Markauskaite, Polly Lai, Michael J. Jacobson
  16. Context in Flux: An invitation to join a think-aloud installation at Research Fest. Dr David Ashe, Melinda J Lewis
  17. “That thing would have been good for this” Multimodal Interaction Analysis. Dewa Wardak
  18. Invigorating Science Investigations using an Inquiry Oriented Pedagogical Instrument. Evan Hefer, Manjula Sharma, Louise Sutherland, Alexandra Yeung, Scott Kable
  19. Enhancing Young Children’s Empathy Development through Purposely Designed Educational Tablet Games. Ling Wu
  20. Learning at multidisciplinary team meetings leading innovation projects. Amanda Lacy
  21. Learning Nanotechnology with Agent-Based Models versus Animations: Gestures Differences in Problem Solving. Polly Lai
  22. Massive online open science. Dr Rebecca LeBard, Geoff Kornfeld, Dr Rosanne Quinnell, Scientia Professor Rob Brooks, Scientia Professor Brett Neilan, Emeritius Professor Brynn Hibbert
  23. Exploring EFL Teachers Competences in Synchronous Telecollaborative Intercultural Communication. Wissam Bin Siddiq
  24. Talking to oneself and others: How self-explanation affects group discussions. Sanri le Roux
  25. Implementation of immersive virtual technology for radiation therapy education. Yobelli Jimenez, Sarah Lewis
  26. A Mobile App in the 1st Year Uni-Life: A Pilot Study. Yu Zhao
  27. MOOClm: Open Learner Models in MOOCs to Guide and Coordinate. Ronny Cook

28 posters on display at the Fest over in 2 sessions, Poster Session 1 from 11.45-12.30 and Poster Session from 2 13.15-14.00.

Poster Session 1, 11.45-12.30
1. Undergraduates as App development partners: a case study from Botany & Computer Science. Alexander Ling, Ahmed Shadid, Michael Johnston, Xilin Huang, Woo Yang Baeg, Scott Dong, Se-Hyun Kevin Ahn, Caroline Cheung, Satyendra Sinha, Rosanne Quinnell
2. Group Formation - How do students' characteristics and behaviour affect group work performance? Augusto Dias Pereira dos Santos, Kalina Yacef
3. A proposal for redesigning problem-based learning in medical education: Contrasting student solutions and improving consolidation. Alisha Portolese, Michael Jacobson, Robbert Duvivier, Lina Markauskaite
4. EQ Clinic: An Online Clinic for Medical Communication Enhancement. Chunfeng Liu
5. Exercise motivation through fully-immersive gamified virtual reality experience. Crystal Yoo
6. Investigating the development of scientific inquiry in undergraduate physics students. Gabriel Nguyen, John O'Byrne, Manjula Sharma
7. Learning and Enactment in Techno-human ecosystem: Embodiment of sociomateriality in sensemaking process. Gilbert Importante, Dr. Lina Markauskaite, Prof. Peter Goodyear
8. A Student ‘Vision Statement’ as a Catalyst for Educational Innovation in Navitas: Towards the ideal technology-enabled learning environment for English Language Students. Jonathan Hvaal
9. What offline and online technologies do higher education students use to complete assessment tasks? Lynnette Lounsbury, Dr David Bolton, Dr Paula Mildenhall, Assoc. Prof. Maria Northcote
10. Learning by enhanced tactile feedback - Montessori sandpaper extended, Michael Tang, Dr. Paul Ginns
11. Visualising socio-material practices in knowledge creation. Natalie Spence
12. Clinical development using reflective learning and ePortfolios: staff and student perceptions. Punyanit Rungnava
13. A quantitative study of students’ experiences, needs and expectations around technology in their personal lives and study in Higher Education, VET and ELICOS contexts. Lucy Blakemore, Yindta Whittington
14. Mirror, mirror: A pre-learning exercise enhances mathematical problem-solving efficiency. Eleni Smyrnis, Paul Ginns


Poster Session 2, 13.15-14.00
15. How collaborative successes and failures become productive: An exploration of emerging understanding and misunderstanding turning points in model-based learning with productive failure. Alisha Portolese, Lina Markauskaite, Polly Lai, Michael J. Jacobson
16. Context in Flux: An invitation to join a think-aloud installation at Research Fest. Dr David Ashe, Melinda J Lewis
17. “That thing would have been good for this” Multimodal Interaction Analysis. Dewa Wardak
18. Invigorating Science Investigations using an Inquiry Oriented Pedagogical Instrument. Evan Hefer, Manjula Sharma, Louise Sutherland, Alexandra Yeung, Scott Kable
19. Enhancing Young Children’s Empathy Development through Purposely Designed Educational Tablet Games. Ling Wu
20. Learning at multidisciplinary team meetings leading innovation projects. Amanda Lacy
21. Learning Nanotechnology with Agent-Based Models versus Animations: Gestures Differences in Problem Solving. Polly Lai
22. Massive online open science. Dr Rebecca LeBard, Geoff Kornfeld, Dr Rosanne Quinnell, Scientia Professor Rob Brooks, Scientia Professor Brett Neilan, Emeritius Professor Brynn Hibbert
23. Exploring EFL Teachers Competences in Synchronous Telecollaborative Intercultural Communication. Wissam Bin Siddiq
24. Talking to oneself and others: How self-explanation affects group discussions. Sanri le Roux
25. Implementation of immersive virtual technology for radiation therapy education. Yobelli Jimenez, Sarah Lewis
26. A Mobile App in the 1st Year Uni-Life: A Pilot Study. Yu Zhao
27. MOOClm: Open Learner Models in MOOCs to Guide and Coordinate. Ronny Cook

rf_discuss.jpgOn November 5, the STL Research Fest will bring together the wider community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to exchange ideas and form new collaborations. Registration to attend is open until Oct 28th at bit.ly/FestReg15. Registration is free but needed for catering purposes.

Timetable

Start End Item
9:45 9:55 Registration
10:00 10:40 Opening and shorter plenary
10:40 11:00 Morning Tea
11:00 11:45 Parallel session 1
11:45 12:30 Poster showcase 1
12:30 13:15 Lunch
13:15 14:00 Poster showcase 2
14:00 14:45 Parallel session 2
14:45 15:00 Refreshments
15:00 16:00 Plenary and closing

The program is still being fleshed out, further details will be posted here, on our website, and emailed to registrants in advance of the Fest.

Parallel sessions

ID Title Presenters/discussants
Parallel session 1 : 11.00-11:45am
1 Mind the gap Abelardo Pardo, Michael Jacobson, Peter Reimann, Kalina Yacef
2 Teaching how to work across boundaries Lina Markauskaite, Peter Goodyear, Marie Carroll, Tina Hinton, Philip Poronnik, Kim Bell-Anderson, Simon Poon
3 Coding, designing and networking Rob Saunders, Lucila Carvalho
Parallel session 2 : 14.00-14:45
4 Learning space research Rob Ellis, Tina Hinton, Pippa Yeoman
5 Professional learning on-the-go Lina Markauskaite, James Edwards, Meg Phelps, Peter Goodyear
6 Cranking up a notch Adam Bridgeman, Wai Yat Wong, Rena Bokosmaty, Meloni Muir

Register now

Registration to attend is open until Oct 28th at bit.ly/FestReg15.

rf_discuss.jpgDo you want to make connections, showcase your work and find out more on recent innovations in learning and knowledge technology research? Register now for the STL Research Fest, our annual event bringing together the wider community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to exchange ideas and form new collaborations.

What to expect

We expect the Fest, which takes place this year on Thurs Nov 5th in the Charles Perkins Centre Hub at the University of Sydney, to attract about 150 people for a full day of activities. Our program depends on what our attendees want to see and show but you can expect: plenaries; parallel workshop, demonstration and roundtable sessions; poster sessions; and the opportunity to network over catered breaks.

Details will be posted here, on our website, and emailed to registrants in advance of the Fest.

Want to present?

If you would like to submit a poster or run a seminar, roundtable or workshop event, please register as soon as possible at bit.ly/FestReg15. The closing date for submission content is Oct 4th. Want to present but don’t have results yet? Our poster sessions attract a diverse range of topics at various stages of research. It's a great chance to let others know about your research or present research design, and to get useful feedback and contacts. Some of the posters from 2014 are available online at http://bit.ly/STLFest14files If you, or someone you know, might be interested in presenting please feel free to contact us and forward this information on.

Register now

Registration to submit posters, presentations and other content is open until Oct 4th. You can register to attend until Oct 21st. Registration is free but needed for catering purposes. Register at bit.ly/FestReg15 or below.

Read more...

MJ-Talk-IMG_0084.jpgOn August 14th Professor Michael Jacobson will present "Beyond Failing to Learn: transforming science education", a Royal Society of New South Wales Free Lunchtime Science Talks, as part of the Sydney Science Festival 2015 at the University of Sydney.

"We are going through a major transition in our ability to understand the complexity of our world, one that rivals the move from Roman numerals to the Hindu–Arabic system we use today. This transition stems from the power and ubiquity of computers, which allow scientists to study and understand the behaviour of complex physical, biological and social systems in new and exciting ways. Opportunities are opening up for learning science that actually draws on what kids these days naturally do — play computer games and engage in virtual online worlds. These methods can be adapted for the classroom, which has the potential to transform the way we teach science."

This free talk will take place at the University of Sydney Business School, CBD Campus, Level 17, 133 Castlereagh Street, from 12.30 to 1.30pm on August 14, 2015. More information at here.

Dr Kate Thompson will present "A multimodal method for analysing complex learning" as part of the program of events at the NSW Learning Analytics Working Group Meeting on June 30th. Her talk will take place on June 30th from 1.40-2.20pm, in the New Law School Lecture Theatre 106.

As the collection of ‘big data’ (in terms of both depth and breadth) becomes more common, it is increasingly important to adopt methods for sharing data, analysing common datasets, and making comparisons across studies. My work has focused on the analysis of the activity of learners. In doing so, I have applied the Activity-Centred Analysis and Design (ACAD) framework to structure the collection of multiple streams of data in order to apply multimodal learning analytics. I have then used the synthesis methodology (most commonly used in ecology), using the ACAD framework to guide this step, in order to understand the activity of learners in complex, collaborative learning environments in a way that can inform the assessment of learners and the redesign of learning materials. In this presentation, I will describe two projects, one the study of high-school students engaged in a collaborative design task about a local environmental issue, and the other, the long-term analysis of a group of students engaged in an online learning task.

The half day event includes a networking lunch, talks by Prof Adam Bridgeman and Dr Kate Thompson, and a plenary discussion titled "Academic analytics versus learning analytics – Rivals or complementary strangers?" More information, the full program and registration for the meeting is at http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au/events/NSW%20Learning%20Analytics%20WG%20Meeting/536/

We would like to invite you to this year's Research Fest. It will take place on Thursday 5 November, in the Charles Perkins Centre Hub, at the University of Sydney. Registration is now open at http://bit.ly/FestReg15.

rf_discuss.jpgThe Research Fest is our annual event inviting the community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to come together to exchange ideas, showcase work, form new collaborations, and catch up on recent innovations in learning and knowledge technology research.

Program details are being finalized and will, as always, depend on what our attendees are interested in demonstrating on the day so register as early as possible if you would like to showcase your work. We expect a full day of activities, including plenaries, poster presentations and parallel workshop and roundtable sessions.

Registration to submit posters, presentations and other content will be open until Sept 21st although earlier submissions are recommended. You can register to attend until Oct 21st. Registration is free but needed for catering purposes, light refreshments will be provided. More details on events and schedule will be emailed to registrants and published at http://sydney.edu.au/research/stl/events/fests.shtml

The 2014 Research Fest plenary, "Learning Analytics: Critical Issues", with Professor Simon Buckingham Shum is now available to view online on YouTube.

Education is about to experience a data tsunami from online trace data (VLEs; MOOCs; Quantified Self) integrated with conventional educational datasets. This requires new kinds of analytics to make sense of this new resource, which in turn asks us to reflect deeply on what kinds of learning we value. We can choose to know more than ever about learners and teachers, but like any modelling technology or accounting system, analytics do not passively describe sociotechnical reality: they begin to shape it. What realities do we want analytics to perpetuate, or bring into being? Can we talk about analytics in the same breath as the deepest values that a wholistic educational experience should nurture? Could analytics become an ally for those who want to shift assessment regimes towards valuing the qualities that many now regard as critical to thriving in the ‘age of complexity’?

The annual STL Research Fest took place on Thursday November 6th in the Education Building (A35) at the University of Sydney. The Fest was opened by Professor Pip Pattison, DVC Education, University of Sydney, and closed with an invited lecture from Professor Simon Buckingham-Shum, Professor of Learning Informatics and Director of the Connected Intelligence Centre at UTS. Slides of the keynote and some of the posters displayed are available online at http://bit.ly/STLFest14files.

Rich Despite Scale, or Rich Because of Scale? MOOCs, SPOCs, and Residential Education

“When MOOCs "exploded" in 2012, they were all about scale: courses, instructors, and MOOC providers try to outdo each other on how many learners they were reaching. An unsurprising backlash came from the criticism that surely at such scales the learning experience would suffer. One unsurprising reaction to that backlash was the position that MOOC technology could also help better package curricular materials for local customization and reuse, that is, the SPOC model.

Both MOOCs and SPOCs have value, but lost in this discussion is a closer examination of which elements of both MOOCs and campus courses are rich because of scale, and which ones we should strive to make rich despite scale. I will give examples of both, based on both our work with doing research on MOOC data and our attempts to handle exploding demands for CS courses at Berkeley (our introductory CS course now enrolls over 1,000 students, and our upper division advanced courses routinely enroll several hundred).”

Armando Fox is a Professor of Computer Science at UC Berkeley as well as the Faculty Advisor to the UC Berkeley MOOCLab. His current research includes online education and high productivity parallel computing. His current teaching activities focus on undergraduate Software Engineering, for which he and Prof. David Patterson have writtenand is the basis of Berkeley’s first free MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). For more information see http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/it/research/news/armando-fox.shtml

  • Speaker: Professor Armando Fox, Computer Science Division, UC Berkeley MOOCLab

  • When: Tuesday 25 November 2014, 3.30-4.30pm - Note: different day and time to usual.

  • Where: The University of Sydney, School of IT Building, SIT Lecture Theatre (Room 123), Level 1

  • For more information go to the Basser seminar series site

The Basser Seminar Series held at the School of Information Technologies provides an opportunity for IT academics and representatives from industry to present and discuss their current work. The seminars offer a glimpse at the cutting-edge of IT research. For more information see http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/it/research/news/seminars.shtml

Join us on 19 November 2014, for our final seminar of the year, presented Dr Sarah Howard and Associate Professor Karl Maton, titled “Pedagogies for knowledge-building: investigating subject-appropriate, cumulative teaching for twenty-first century school classrooms”.

To succeed in today’s knowledge society, young people need to quickly grasp the organising principles for building different forms of knowledge. Our interdisciplinary project explores how teachers marshall the resources of modern classrooms to apprentice students into subject-specific principles for knowledge-building in Science and History. In this presentation we'll be looking at video samples from the classroom to see how we are attempting to observe, identify and analyze knowledge building, and a few of our early findings in the project. Early results suggest implications for the role of digital resources in teaching, integration of general capabilities and cross-curricular teaching.

Read more...

Join us on November 14 when Associate Professor Daniel T Hickey presents "Open digital badges: lessons learned from the Design Principles Documentation project".

100Hickey.jpg

Digital badges offer new ways to recognise learning and accomplishment. They can contain specific claims and detailed evidence supporting those claims, and links to additional evidence. Open digital badges are interoperable, allowing earners to control where and how this information is presented and circulated. Proponents argue that these changes will allow some and force others to transcend traditional paradigms for recognising, assessing, motivating and studying learning.

Dr Hickey will present the evidence and design principles from a two-year study of the 30 badge-development projects funded in the 2012 Badges for Lifelong Learning competition. Particular attention was paid to the contextual factors that supported some badge practices while undermining others. He will also discuss his new project advancing the use of badges in major learning-management systems in higher education

  • When: 1.00pm - 2.00pm
  • Where: Education Building (A35), Room 424
  • For more information, see the event website.

All events take place in the Education Building (A35) at the University of Sydney. Registration and information is available in the Staff Common Room (401).

Program of events

Event Start End Venue
Badge pick-up and registration desk open 9.45 10.00 Common Room (401)
Opening plenary with DVC (Education) Prof Pip Pattison 10.00 10.40 351
Morning tea (catered) 10.40 11.00 Common Room (401)
Poster workshop sessions 1 and 2 11.00 12.25 323 & 325
Workshop session 1 12.30 1.15 Various level 4
Lunch (catered) 1.15 1.45 Common Room (401)
Workshop session 2 1.45 2.30 Various level 4
Closing plenary with Prof Simon Buckingham Shum 2.30 3.30 351

Posters

Poster Session 1: 11.00 - 11.40, all odd numbered posters (1, 3, 5 etc)

  • 1. A Rubric for the Selection and Creation of Videogames for Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages - Douglas Agar
  • 3. Placing focus in Malawian and UK primary schools: Is there a difference? - David Ashe, Nina Bonderup Dohn
  • 5. Technology Supported Group Ideation in the Classroom - Andrew Clayphan
  • 7. Scientific Representational Fluency: Defining, Diagnosing and Developing the use of graphs, words, equations and diagrams in science - Matthew Hill, Manjula Sharma, Helen Johnston
  • 9. Conceptualizing professional identity practices in higher education: The case of engineering students - Maryam Khosronejad
  • 11. The Value of Agent-Based Models for Learning about Nanotechnology - Polly Lai
  • 13. Designing material and digital spaces for learning - Martin Parisio
  • 15. Model-based Learning with Productive Failure and Analogical Encoding: Unpacking Learning Dynamics with Contrasting Designs - Alisha Portolese, Lina Markauskaite, Polly Lai, & Michael J. Jacobson
  • 17. Promoting Mental Health in Students - Emily Schulz
  • 19. Designing for Epistemic Agency - How student groups create knowledge and what helps them do it - Natalie Spence
  • 21. Applying SLOW to ICT-rich education - Mirian Tanti
  • 23. Improving dyslexic students’ reading abilities: the role of hypermedia multimodal texts - Piergiorgio Trevisan
  • 25. Personal hypothesis evaluation based on ubicomp sensors using pervasive displays - Farahnaz Yekeh
  • 27. A Mobile App in the 1st Year Uni-Life: A Pilot Study - Yu Zhao

Poster Session 2: 11.45 - 12 .25, all even numbered posters (2, 4, 6 etc)

    • 2. Personalisation of Learning: Students informing practice - Learning and Teaching at UNSW: Sonal Bhalla, Belinda Allen, Lyn Collins, Kristin Turnbull, John Vulic
    • 4. Shift in a University Lecturer’s Activation of Mental Resources - Shaista Bibi
    • 6. Developing Staff Capability for Teaching and Learning across Multiple Higher Education Sectors - Christina Del Medico, Ann Wilson, Iain Doherty
    • 8. Learning and Enactment in Techno-Human Ecosystems: Implications for sustainable learning and innovation of farmers in the Philippines - Gilbert Importante
    • 10. Teams making sense of disruptive technologies - Amanda (Mandy) Lacy
    • 12. The digital habitus of academic missions: Is an eNexus the missing link? - Melinda J Lewis
    • 14. Driving curriculum and technological change to support writing in the engineering disciplines - Hamed Monkaresi, Sarah K. Howard, Rafael A. Calvo, Anindito Aditomo
    • 16. Architecture of Productive Learning Networks Analysis for Design - Ana Pinto
    • 18. Student teachers’ digital competence development in teacher education: A Norwegian case study - Fredrik Mørk Røkenes
    • 20. Conceptualising a project team as a site for networked learning – an exploration of expertise and tacit knowing - Paul Sijpkes
    • 22. Towards Long Term Goals: Gamified Tangible Internet Connected Goal Buttons - Lie Ming Tang
    • 24. eLearning: Exploring the role of a social network site with learning purposes in the primary classroom - Patricia Thibaut
    • 26. Traces on the Walls and Traces in the Air (Drawings and Gestures in Educational Design Team Meetings) - Dewa Wardak
    • 28. The problem with noise, or the NOISE in the problem? - Pippa Yeoman

    Roundtables

    Please note each roundtable, unless otherwise stated, has a max of 35 people.

    Title Chairs Timeslot
    Personalised Education: Where to Start and in Which Direction Abelardo Pardo, Kalina Yacef, Tim Shaw, Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick 12.30-1.15
    Optimising online lectures Jo Lander, Karen Scott 12.30-1.15
    MOOCs at the University of Sydney Bob Kummerfeld, Judy Kay 1.45-2.30
    Education as a complex system: Implications for educational research and policy Michael Jacobson 1.45-2.30
    Beyond the Flipped Classroom: Theory, Research, and Rubber Hits the Road Phil Poronnik, Michael Jacobson 12.30-1.15
    Educational data mining and learning analytics: Opportunities and pitfalls Lina Markauskaite, Abelardo Pardo, Peter Reimann, Kalina Yacef 1.45-2.30
    CampusFlora[at]sydney Rosanne Quinnell 12.30-1.15
    From sage on the stage to guide on the side Manjula Sharma, Helen Georgiou, Matthew Hill 1.45-2.30
    Just Ask Charlie: Using an app to support professional learning from student feedback Kate Thomson, Jen Scott Curwood, Martin Tomitsch, Graham Hendry, Andrea Lau, and Liam Moy 1.45-2.30
    Visit to the Educational Design Research Studio (EDRS). Note: 20 spaces only. Peter Goodyear, Roberto Martinez-Maldonado & Martin Parisio 12.30-1.15

    Closing plenary with Simon Buckingham Shum

    SimonBuckinghamShum.jpgThe closing plenary on the day will be on Learning Analytics: Critical Issues and presented by Simon Buckingham Shum, Professor of Learning Informatics and director of the Connected Intelligence Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney.

    Education is about to experience a data tsunami from online trace data (VLEs; MOOCs; Quantified Self) integrated with conventional educational datasets. This requires new kinds of analytics to make sense of this new resource, which in turn asks us to reflect deeply on what kinds of learning we value. We can choose to know more than ever about learners and teachers, but like any modelling technology or accounting system, analytics do not passively describe sociotechnical reality: they begin to shape it. What realities do we want analytics to perpetuate, or bring into being? Can we talk about analytics in the same breath as the deepest values that a wholistic educational experience should nurture? Could analytics become an ally for those who want to shift assessment regimes towards valuing the qualities that many now regard as critical to thriving in the ‘age of complexity’?

  • Here is the timetable for roundtables at the Research Fest. Please note each roundtable, unless otherwise stated, has a max of 35 people including chairs due to room regulations. Sign up will be available online from Monday or in person on the day and it's first in gets the spot!

    Title Chairs Timeslot
    Personalised Education: Where to Start and in Which Direction Abelardo Pardo, Kalina Yacef, Tim Shaw, Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick 12.30-1.15
    Optimising online lectures Jo Lander, Karen Scott 12.30-1.15
    MOOCs at the University of Sydney Bob Kummerfeld, Judy Kay 1.45-2.30
    Education as a complex system: Implications for educational research and policy Michael Jacobson 1.45-2.30
    Beyond the Flipped Classroom: Theory, Research, and Rubber Hits the Road Phil Poronnik, Michael Jacobson 12.30-1.15
    Educational data mining and learning analytics: Opportunities and pitfalls Lina Markauskaite, Abelardo Pardo, Peter Reimann, Kalina Yacef 1.45-2.30
    CampusFlora[at]sydney Rosanne Quinnell 12.30-1.15
    From sage on the stage to guide on the side Manjula Sharma, Helen Georgiou, Matthew Hill 1.45-2.30
    Just Ask Charlie: Using an app to support professional learning from student feedback Kate Thomson, Jen Scott Curwood, Martin Tomitsch, Graham Hendry, Andrea Lau, and Liam Moy 1.45-2.30
    Visit to the Educational Design Research Studio (EDRS). Note: 20 spaces only. Peter Goodyear, Roberto Martinez-Maldonado & Martin Parisio 12.30-1.15

    If you haven't registered yet, there is still time - get over to http://bit.ly/STLFest14 and sign up.

    There's one week to go to our research fest and it's looking to be a great day. If you haven't registered yet, there is still time - get over to http://bit.ly/STLFest14 before the 31st and sign up.

    SimonBuckinghamShum.jpgThe closing plenary on the day will be on Learning Analytics: Critical Issues and presented by Simon Buckingham Shum, Professor of Learning Informatics and director of the Connected Intelligence Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney.

    Education is about to experience a data tsunami from online trace data (VLEs; MOOCs; Quantified Self) integrated with conventional educational datasets. This requires new kinds of analytics to make sense of this new resource, which in turn asks us to reflect deeply on what kinds of learning we value. We can choose to know more than ever about learners and teachers, but like any modelling technology or accounting system, analytics do not passively describe sociotechnical reality: they begin to shape it. What realities do we want analytics to perpetuate, or bring into being? Can we talk about analytics in the same breath as the deepest values that a wholistic educational experience should nurture? Could analytics become an ally for those who want to shift assessment regimes towards valuing the qualities that many now regard as critical to thriving in the ‘age of complexity’?

    Here's the timetable of events.

    Event Start End Venue
    Badge pick-up and registration desk open 9.45 10.00 Common Room (401)
    Opening plenary with DVC (Education) Prof Pip Pattison 10.00 10.40 351
    Morning tea (catered) 10.40 11.00 Common Room (401)
    Poster workshop sessions 1 and 2 11.00 12.25 323 & 325
    Workshop session 1 12.30 1.15 Various level 4
    Lunch (catered) 1.15 1.45 Common Room (401)
    Workshop session 2 1.45 2.30 Various level 4
    Closing plenary with Prof Simon Buckingham Shum 2.30 3.30 351

    We would like to invite you to our annual Research Fest, to be held this year on Thursday 6 November in the Education Building (A35) at the University of Sydney. Registration is now open at http://bit.ly/STLFest14. More information on the Fest can be found on the STL site.

    rf_discuss.jpgThe Research Fest is our annual event inviting the community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to come together to exchange ideas, showcase work, form new collaborations, and catch up on recent innovations in learning and knowledge technology research.

    Program details are being finalized and will, as always, depend on what our attendees are interested in demonstrating on the day so register as early as possible if you would like to showcase your work. We expect the day will go from approximately 9.45am to 4pm. The Fest will be opened by Professor Pip Pattison, DVC Education, University of Sydney, and will close with an invited lecture from Professor Simon Buckingham-Shum, Professor of Learning Informatics and Director of the Connected Intelligence Centre at UTS. It will also include poster presentations and parallel workshop, seminar and roundtable sessions, as well as opportunities to catch up over breaks and a catered lunch.

    Registration to submit posters, presentations and roundtables is open until Oct 20th and attendance only registration is open until Oct 31st although earlier registration would be much appreciated! The Fest is a free event but registration is essential for capacity and catering needs.

    We have several events coming up in the next month:

    rf_discuss.jpg

    1. Tuesday Oct 7 - Bonnie Nardi presents Heteromation: Dividing Labor between People and Machine, a jointly-sponsored talk by Human Centered Technology Cluster and the Sciences & Technologies of Learning Network. We have a few spaces left and your RSVP is essential - please go to http://bit.ly/Oct7Nardi.

    2. Wednesday Oct 15 - our regular seminar series sees Sid Newton & Russell Lowe present on Hyper-Immersive Learning and Teaching at 11am in room 230 of the Education Building. No RSVP needed, just come along.

    3. Wednesday Oct 29 - Professor John Sutton presents on Collaborative Memory and Distributed Cognitive Ecologies at 11am in room 230 of the Education Building.No RSVP needed, just come along.

    And don't forget that the 2014 Research Fest will take place on Thursday Nov 6 in the Education Building, more details to follow soon on the program and exact timing!

    The Dalai Lama states that “If you wish to make others happy, practice compassion. If you wish to be happy, practice compassion”. According to Stanford neuroscientist, Professor James Doty, we now have the science to show it. At this event Professor Doty, director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) will come together with Venerable Bhante Mahinda, spiritual director of the Australian Buddhist Mission and revered Buddhist monk. Through cross-disciplinary dialogue they will provide insight into the critical importance and “value proposition” of compassion and how 21st century science and ancient contemplative practice are learning from each other.

    • Date: Wednesday 3 September
    • Time: 6 to 7.30 pm
    • Venue: Law School Foyer, Level 2, Sydney Law School, Eastern Avenue
    • Cost: Free event, registration required. Register here.

    The discussion will be facilitated by Associate Professor Rafael Calvo, director of the University of Sydney’s Positive Computing Lab and co-presented with the Positive Computing lab in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies at the University of Sydney. For more information and to register, go to the events' calendar.

    Read more...

    RC.jpg On Friday the 8th of August at 4pm Associate Professor Rafael Calvo presents Positive Computing: Technologies for psychological wellbeing and human potential. The talk will take place in room 424 of the Education Building, Camperdown, University of Sydney.

    Digital technologies have made their way into all the aspects of our lives that, according to psychology, influence our wellbeing -- everything from social relationships and curiosity to engagement and learning. By bringing together research and methodologies well-established in psychology, education, neuroscience and human-computer interaction, we can begin to cultivate a new field dedicated to the design and development of technology that supports wellbeing and human potential. More specifically, in this seminar I will present an introduction to our Human-Computer interaction work aiming to support psychological wellbeing. The suggested HCI framework builds on psychology, education, design and other disciplines addressing intrapersonal factors of wellbeing such as motivation, engagement, reflective thought and mindfulness, interpersonal factors such as empathy, and extrapersonal such as altruism.

    Read more...

    stockvault-bridge-in-martinique114729.jpg

    Last month we held the first session of the CoCo Research Students Doctoral Colloquia for 2014. This initiative started as the need for a venue for doctoral students to present and receive feedback for their work in an academic environment (more information about past Colloquia sessions can be found in this post). Over the course of two and half hours, five students and an audience composed by academics and post-grad students discussed preliminary findings and key issues of their research projects.

    The Doctoral Colloquia 2014 featured compelling presentations on topics that included a range of learning settings such as Higher Education, Adult and School Education and a variety of topics involving design for learning, conceptions of ICT, learning technologies and the effects of ICT in informal settings.

    After each colloquia, Dewa Wardak and myself (the co-convenors) will provide a summary of the sessions. The dates for the upcoming sessions are:
    Tuesday 5th of August
    Tuesday 21st of October
    We now include a brief summary of the presentations and the links to the presenters’ pages for further information.

    Read more...

    image240.1.png


    The "Research Methods and Practices in the Sciences and Technologies of Learning" is a monthly workshop, which is organized in independent thematic sessions, with a focus on ‘hands on’ activities and roundtable discussions. The workshops are normally held on the first Wednesday of each month. Sessions invite researchers to reflect on issues related to methods and practices in the various phases of knowledge production: from planning and conducting data collection, to strategies to organize, analyse and visualize data; from ways of engaging in research collaboration, to sharing research outputs, writing, publishing and other forms of research dissemination in academia.

    On the 2nd of April, Roberto Martinez-Maldonado will talk about the methods he used in his PhD research on the topic of designing support tools for teachers and analysing small group face-to-face collaboration; and he will introduce some qualitative and quantitative techniques used in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI).

    Upcoming workshops this year will include:
    • Discourse Analysis :: May 7
    • Academic Writing :: June 4
    • Online Ethnography :: September 3

    When: 11.00am - 12.00pm
    Where: Education Building (A35) Room 236 (CoCo Lab)
    Places are limited, to RSVP please email lucila.carvalho@sydney.edu.au

    ResearchFest_collage.jpg


    Last Thursday the 6th annual Research Fest was held, hosted by the Sciences and Technologies of Learning Research network. Highlights of the event included a thought provoking keynote from Bob Kummerfeld, 9 interactive sessions that touched on a variety of topics such as positive computing, learning analytics, virtual worlds, architectures of productive learning networks, and over 40 engaging poster presentations from UNSW, UTS, Macquarie University, The Garvan Institute, Avondale College of Higher Education, and Sydney University.

    Read more...

    The newly established Sydney Medicine and Health eLearning Network aims to support teaching, research and collaborations in technology-enhanced learning and teaching in health.

    As a precursor of this new initiative an eLearning Showcase will take place on Friday, 29 November. This Showcase will highlight teaching and research initiatives in elearning from across Sydney Medical School, Sydney Nursing School, the Faculties of Dentistry, Health Sciences and Pharmacy, and all others working in the area of health.

    Register to attend or share your research work at http://goo.gl/2nCXgs (regsitration for paper submissions closes on Friday 8th of November)

    research_fest.jpg

    The Research Fest is our annual event inviting the community of researchers and practitioners in the sciences and technologies of learning to come together to exchange ideas, showcase work, form new collaborations, and catch up on recent innovations in learning and knowledge technology research.

    It is a free event, open to all researchers and practitioners in the field of sciences and technologies of learning. If you'd like to take part (either presenting your research, or just attending), please register here

    When: Thursday, 7. November 2013, from 10am to 4pm
    Where: IT and PNR Buildings of the University of Sydney
    Need more information? Please email Agnieszka Bachfischer at agnieszka.bachfischer@sydney.edu.au

    The video and audio files of the recent Symposium, MOOCs and the Student Experience of Blended Learning are now available for you to download here

    blog.jpgJoin us on August 13th for a collaborative evening event on exploiting data to improve professional practice.

    Despite advances in research and shifts in policy, professional practices can be slow to change. At the same time, there is a growing abundance of data available on everyone’s performance in the workplace. Utilising such data to guide the professional development of individuals is one way of improving professional practices. How we collect, present and manage the use of this data to tailor professional development and improve practice requires research input from many disciplines - including IT, the learning sciences, workplace research and policy.

    The STL network hopes this event will create new research partnerships as well as and strengthen existing ones. We are seeking registrations of interest from:

    1. university researchers with relevant expertise who want to help advance a research agenda on the topic (‘research collaborator’) and
    2. staff who, at this stage, just want to learn more (‘audience member’).

    The event will provide overviews of some of the issues and challenges, as well as possible research approaches and solutions regarding data use for professional development. A key goal of the event is to promote future research collaborations in this area.

    Read more...

    On Monday 8th July, the University of Sydney is hosting a meeting on MOOCs and the student experience of blended learning. This blog entry is the starting point for an online discussion to supplement the presentations and debate in the meeting.

    You can participate in the discussion by adding a Comment to this entry. Comments will be treated like 'letters to the editor' - they will be moderated, may be edited, should be expressed in concise and temperate language and will only be published if - in the view of the editor - they make a contribution to advancing the discussion. Be relevant and interesting. Anonymous comments will not be published. Please conclude your comment with your name and brief affiliation.

    Peter Goodyear, Faculty of Education & Social Work, STL Network

    16 comments | Read more...

    This event has been postponed to Semester 2, 2013.

    A CoCo Seminar by Shannon Kennedy-Clark titled “It was a successful troll – an examination of the grammar of trolling”.

    SKC.jpg In this presentation, the grammar of trolling and the linguistic strategies, both overt and implied, which participants in computer-mediated communications use in trolling and subversively redefining the online space for playful purposes will be examined. The strategies used by the targets of trolling, either individually or collectively, to (attempt to) repair damaged conversations and reclaim the space will be outlined.

    When: 19 June 11.00am - 12.00pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    No RSVP is needed, just turn up on the day.
    More information at University events' page.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/

    SPR100.jpgWant to know more about publishing your research or putting together a book proposal? Join us on June 26th when Springer Science+Business Media editors Nick Melchior and Bernadette Ohmer discuss the best ways of getting into print.

    There will be an informal short presentation on publishing your research and how to develop ideas from research into a book proposal. This will be followed by a general discussion along with the opportunity to discuss specific publishing ideas. Nick is Senior Publishing Editor in Education for Australia & New Zealand and Bernadette Ohmer is Publishing Editor in Science Education, Educational Psychology, Vocational and Professional Education.

    When: 26 June 11.00am - 12.00pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will not be available online.

    Fotolia_27029802_Subscription_sml.jpgAs a precursor to this year’s 2013 Teaching Colloquium, a symposium on MOOCS and the student experience of blended learning will take place at the University on the 8th of July from 12 noon to 5pm.

    The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) is hosting the event, which is sponsored by the University of Sydney Association of Professors and STL.

    Themes will include the challenges, opportunities and risks created by MOOCs and the student experience of blended learning for research-intensive, campus-based Universities. Key speakers are: Professor Diana Laurillard of the London Institute of Education; Professor Peter Goodyear, Australia’s first ARC Laureate in Education; and Mr Andrew Norton of the Australian Grattan Institute, along with other speakers knowledgeable about the student experience of blended learning and MOOCs in the future of Higher Education in Australia.

    The program and more details of the event will be made available shortly. Register now at http://sydney.edu.au/elearning/pd/MoocSymposiumRego.php, as spaces are limited.

    rf_discuss.jpg Join us on June 12 for a CoCo Seminar by Minkang Kim and Derek Sankey titled Theory and metatheory in developmental science.

    Human development has a long pedigree in teacher education, much of it influenced by cognitive development theory (Piaget) and social cultural theory (Vygotsky). Both have provided theoretical perspectives on the nature of learning. Recently, however, mainstream human-development studies have been undergoing considerable change, partly as a result of challenges from neuroscience, but much more fundamentally in regard to the prospect of establishing an overarching metatheory for human development, prompted by dynamic systems theory. Yet this shaking of the theoretical foundations has hardly begun to permeate education.

    When: 12 June, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    Read more...

    Way.jpgJoin us on the 29th of May for a CoCo Seminar by Dr. Jennifer Way titled “The Engagement, Learning and Technology Nexus (ELTN)”.

    This presentation describes the first version of a model for describing the interactions between characteristics of a particular discipline (e.g. mathematics, history), the affordances of digital devices and resources (e.g. learning objects, cameras) and the engagement (behavioural, emotional and cognitive) of students in learning experiences. The overall goal is to better understand how to stimulate productive thinking processes that have significance in terms of discipline-specific understandings. Of particular interest is the pre-service teacher education context, in which the ‘students’ are expected to transition into the teacher role and transform their own learning experiences into pedagogy for their own young students.

    When: 29 May, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    Read more...

    Vivid.jpg
    As part of the VIVID 2013 Festival's Ideas Theme, members of the STL will speak as part of the evening series of talks at 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm, 3rd June, at Seymour Centre, University of Sydney, entitled: "I'm not creative but...."

    The talks are on the creative dimensions of computer science and HCI, by Judy Kay, and interaction design for information interfaces in everyday environments by Martin Tomitsch.

    Read more...

    Join us on the 22nd of May for a CoCo Seminar by Dr. Chwee Beng Lee titled “Empowering pre-service teachers’ problem solving using adaptive scaffolding within a systems dynamic learning environment”.

    The focus of this presentation is based on a recent submitted ARC discovery project proposal by three institutions, University of Western Sydney, Sydney University and Nayang Technological University-Singapore on the topic of developing pre-service teachers’ problem solving skills through situating them in a web-based learning environment.

    When: 22 May, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    arcuili.jpgJoin us on the 15th of May for a CoCo Seminar by Joanne Arciuli titled “Statistical learning: What is it and why might it be of interest to clinicians and educators?”.

    Statistical learning (SL) refers to the brain’s capacity to detect and learn from statistical regularities present in the environment. A substantial body of research demonstrates that SL is a powerful form of implicit learning, one that is present in young infants, is multi-modal, and operates across a variety of stimuli (including, for example, natural speech, musical tones, and geometric shapes). It is thought that SL may contribute to a wide range of mental activities including language acquisition and object recognition.

    Dr Arciuli is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Health Sciences at The University of Sydney and a cognitive scientist with research expertise across the areas of language, literacy and learning. She enjoys interdisciplinary collaborations and has published in journals representing the disciplines of Psychology, Linguistics, Neuroscience and Speech Pathology.

    When: 15 May, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    Join us on the 8th of May for a seminar by Andy Dong titled “The Five Cognitive Strategies of Design Thinking and Their (Potential) Contributions to Learning by Design”.

    dong.jpg

    The concept of design thinking exceeds the field of design studies. In addition to the practical, technical tools of design, many scholars view design thinking as underpinned by a particular set of cognitive strategies.

    In this talk, I will discuss the five cognitive strategies associated with design thinking: framing, abduction, analogising, prototyping, and mental simulation. I will also relate them to hypothesised cognitive behaviours that are at the heart of design thinking, based upon research in animal innovation and early childhood cognitive development, and discuss of how insights from cognitive design research on design thinking could contribute to learning by design.

    Andy Dong is the Warren Center Chair of Engineering Innovation in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies and an ARC Future Fellow. His research addresses the structure and function of design knowledge and the causal importance of the structures and processes of design knowledge production to design-led innovation.

    When: 8 May, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    Fotolia_20421333_Subscription_XXLsml.jpgJoin us on the 24th of April for a CoCo seminar by Simon Crook titled “The Digital Education Revolution: Initial data analysis of teacher and student reported use of laptops in year 10 science”.

    In Australia, since 2008, 1:1 laptops have been introduced into all secondary schools through the Federal Government’s Digital Education Revolution. This study examines survey responses from 1245 science students and 47 science teachers from 14 secondary schools in Sydney in 2010.

    When: 24 April, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    More information at the University events' webpage.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    roberto.jpg
    Join us on 17 April for a CoCo seminar by Roberto Martinez titled “Interactive Tabletops for Learning: can they help teachers support face-to-face collaboration?”.

    There have been many promises and expectations about the role of technology to "solve" many educational problems. Although there is substantial research work on automatic support of collaborative learning through networked systems, there is still little research on enhancing teachers awareness when learners perform small-group face-to-face activities in the classroom.

    Interactive tabletops offer new possibilities to enhance teaching and learning in the classroom, but they also impose new challenges. The prices are coming down but the question remains, can Interactive Tabletops be successfully implemented in a regular classroom?

    Read more...

    On April 10th, Professor Sten Ludvigsen of the University of Oslo will present "Learning with, and coordination between, representations in science and mathematics: “What should I do next?”".

    Sten.jpg

    In science and math, learning involves the development of the capacity to use and follow procedures and understand specific concepts and conceptual systems. In areas like DNA analysis and geometry (surface/volume ratio), representations are a key resource for learning new concepts. To develop an understanding of concepts, students must unpack the meanings inscribed in the representations and select and coordinate between such meanings in order to perform tasks and solve problems. Such unpacking is not cognitively trivial and is contingent upon how the knowledge becomes framed and talked about in the activities. In a series of studies in the Science Created by You (SCY) project, we investigated how students developed a conceptual understanding of specific concepts in science and math (e.g., DNA and geometry). In SCY, we designed four missions to study this issue. Overall, we asked one guiding research question: How does students understanding of concepts change during an SCY-Mission?

    When: 10 April, 11.00am - 12.30pm. (Arrive at 10.45am for refreshments.)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230.
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2

    Read more...

    fimg_intro_secondary_01.jpgThe next ASELL Schools Science workshop will be held on Friday 26 April 2013 at SHORE School in North Sydney.

    ASELL Schools Workshops are designed to help teachers improve experiments run in their classrooms and to improve students' experiences. This workshop will include a mixture of discussions and laboratory-based activities. We invite interested teachers to attend and/or submit an experiment for evaluation. You are also invited to bring two students from your school as well as another teacher from either your school or another Sydney school. This is a great opportunity to view a range of practicals in a 'hands on' format that your colleagues at other schools use in their teaching, share ideas as well as to network and build your existing community. More importantly, ASELL and the workshop will be a way that teachers and academics can work together in improving science experiments and experiences for high school students.

    For more information see the website.

    • Date: Friday 26 April 2013
    • Venue: SHORE School, Blue Street, North Sydney, NSW, 2060
    • Time: 8:30am-4pm
    • Registrations due: 5 April 2013.
    • Cost: Free

    Anind.jpgOn April 2, 2013, STL co-sponsor the Human Centred Technology (HCT) workshop "Harnessing Unobtrusive Sensing
    to Understand Human Behaviour for Lifelong Goals
    ".

    Emerging technologies are creating ways to unobtrusively sense and capture data about various aspects of people's lives. This data can be combined with Persuasive and other personalised interfaces to help people achieve their most important diverse long term goals. For the first time, it has become feasible for people to easily capture evidence about their actual behaviour.

    This data can serve many valuable purposes. It can be transformed into a dashboard that help people monitor their progress. It can drive personalised applications that help people remember their intended goals. It can also drive personalised information delivery that gives the right information at the right time.

    This all day workshop event is sponsored by the Sciences and Technologies of Learning (STL) Network and Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies at the University of Sydney, and organised in conjunction with Persuasive 2013. It is is free to attend - register online by March 31st, 2013.

    Read more...

    The ASELL National Science workshop will be held at the University of Sydney on Tuesday 2 April - Friday 5 April 2013. The ASELL project aims to improve the quality of learning in undergraduate science laboratories by making available student tested, peer reviewed experiments which are scientifically and educationally sound.

    Universities are invited to send 2-person teams (one academic and one student). The workshop includes a mixture of discussions and laboratory-based activities. Disciplines to be addressed include biology, chemistry, physics and allied disciplines.

    • Registrations due: 18 March 2013.
    • Cost: AUD$660 (GST inclusive) per team (includes food)
    • Contact: Dr Alexandra Yeung at 02 9351 8715
    • Email: alexandra.yeung@sydney.edu.au

    For more information and to register, see their website.

    Pardo.jpg
    On March 13th 2013, we will restart our Sciences and Technologies of Learning seminar series with our first seminar of 2013. Join us, online or in person, when STL lead researcher, Abelardo Pardo of LATTE, presents on “Using Learning Analytics to help Flip the Classroom”.

    The term flipped classroom denotes a teaching strategy in which face to face time with the students is reserved to activities requiring active participation and other tasks such as readings are supposed to occur before the lecture takes place. The change translates into a significant perturbation on how lecturers must approach a session, and more importantly the type of activities to prepare.

    The ubiquitous presence of technology together with the evolution of computing power allow for the use of learning analytics, collect, analyse and use data about how students interact to adapt these activities to maximize learning gains. How can these techniques be used in a day to day class?

    Read more...

    On Monday February 18th the Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI) group present a seminar with Professor Gord McCalla, titled The Ecological Approach: A Framework for Supporting Learning and Learning System Design. The seminar takes place on Monday 18 February, from 12.00pm, in the School of IT Room 124 at the University of Sydney.

    This talk will overview my evolving perspectives on the design of environments to support learning. The basic philosophy is that such environments must be deeply aware of the surrounding context of learning – technical, personal, social, and cultural – and must be adaptive to differences in this context. This philosophy has led to the development of a framework for supporting learning called the ecological approach that allows a learning system to naturally evolve and change as the learning context changes. The talk will present past and current research related to ecological systems. But it will also look forward to possible future applications including the development of simulated learning environments for testing various learning system architectures and the creation of a lifelong learning companion.

    Read more...

    The Institute for Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education (IISME) are holding their annual event to kick off the year on February 13. This year's half-day event is titled Teaching Science to Non-Science Majors: How do we engage the students? and is convened by Dr Meloni Muir and A/Prof Adam Bridgeman.

    Tertiary academics are acutely aware of the challenge of motivating undergraduate students, particularly in large classes, to engage with lecture material. It can be even more challenging when teaching the basic sciences as service units of study where students may not see the need for or relevance of these units of study to their degree or career aspirations yet are required to successfully complete them. This symposium will bring together academics and students from a range of disciplines to discuss perspectives on teaching in science service units of study with examples of successful strategies for engaging students. The keynote speakers will be Dr Kay Colthorpe (University of Queensland) and Associate Professor Les Kirkup (University of Technology, Sydney).

    Further details may be found on the University event page - please register there by 8 Feb if you would like to attend.

    SS.jpgProfessor Svein Sjøberg will be presenting a seminar on International comparisons: Good and bad experiences from the OECD - PISA project. The seminar will be on Friday 7 December 2012, from 11:15am to 12:30pm at New Law School Annexe Seminar Room 342, at the University of Sydney. Turn up from 11am to get some nibbles.

    Professor Svein Sjøberg is a special advisor to the EU, OECD and a number of European countries on the areas of learning and the natural sciences. Based on his experiences as part of these executive committees, he will share his critical concerns about this undertaking.

    For more details and RSVP, please here.

    rf_discuss.jpgJoin us on November 21 for the final CoCo seminar of 2012. David Ashe and Shaista Bibi will present a joint seminar on “Teaching and learning: a knowledge in pieces perspective”.

    David Ashe will discuss “School students’ scientific thinking: Is the Earth getting heavier?”, presenting some initial findings taken from a series of interviews with students as they considered a socio-scientific issue regarding sustainability. Taking a ‘knowledge in pieces’ theoretical perspective, David is hoping to help explain why students sometimes have difficulty in utilizing ‘known’ knowledge in different contexts.

    Shaista will present her study, “Planning to teach with ICT: what do teachers need to know?”, exploring the nature of university teachers’ technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) when they are involved in making ICT related design and teaching decisions, using knowledge in pieces theoretical framework in her research.

    When: Wed 21 Nov from 11.00am – 12.30pm (come at 10.45 for tea and biscuits)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230
    More information: available here.
    Online: This seminar will be available live at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2.

    RC.jpgJoin us on the 14th of November for a CoCo-CHAI-LATTE seminar by Associate Professor Rafael Calvo titled ‘Positive Computing: How can technology support wellbeing?’

    Digital technologies have made their way into all the aspects of our lives that, according to psychology, influence our wellbeing -- everything from social relationships and curiosity to engagement and meaning. As computers are gradually embedded into all the life experiences that shape us, isn’t it our responsibility to expect more from the way they impact our lives?

    More information available here.

    Read more...

    Dorian.jpgJoin us on November 7th for a CoCo Seminar by Dorian Peters titled “eLearning Interface Design: A research-based approach to supporting learning outcomes through design”.

    Research has shown that how you design the interface of an online learning experience can affect how well your users learn (Lidwell, Mayer, Marcus, Mikropoulos, Norman, etc.). Yet many people still harbour the misconception that multimedia design is cosmetic. In reality, the ways you use color, graphics, sequencing, animation, controls, navigation, audio, etc. can all change the learning experience. It’s a complex area and will only get more significant as learning experiences become increasingly digital."

    Read more...

    VW.jpg Join us on the 31st of October for a CoCo-CHAI-LATTE seminar by Professor Michael J. Jacobson titled ‘Beyond Serious Games: Computational scientific inquiry with agent-based virtual environments for learning’.

    The use of games to serve educational purposes, sometimes referred to as “serious games,” has received considerable recent attention. This talk explores the thesis that virtual experiences may be able to reflect salient aspects of the cultural practices of science as part of the learning activities. A consequence of this perspective is that learning does not wholly occur “in” the virtual experiences of a serious game, but rather, learning is mediated by virtual experiences that reflect culturally authentic practices in modern science.

    I discuss research which my team has developed an agent-based virtual environment consisting of an immersive virtual world for experiencing and exploring a complex ecosystem as part of "virtual" biology fieldwork, including findings from a recent school-based study and implications of this approach for learning science.

    Michael J. Jacobson, Ph.D., is a Professor and Chair of Education in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, co-director of CoCo and deputy director of IISME. Most recently, his work has explored learning with immersive virtual environments and agent-based modeling and visualization tools, as well as cognitive and learning issues related to understanding new scientific perspectives emerging from the study of complex systems.

    When: Weds Oct 31, 11.00am - 12.30pm (arrive at 10.45am for tea and biscuits)
    Where: Education Building (A35), Room 230
    More information: Beyond Serious Games
    This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2.


    If you'd like to catch one of our seminars on the sciences and technologies of learning, but can't attend on the day, there are plenty of options for seeing them online.


    rf_discuss.jpgThe seminar series runs most Wednesdays during term in room 230 of the Education Building, at the University of Sydney, and is hosted by the CoCo Centre or CoCo-CHAI-LATTE. The series hosts local and international experts, who share and discuss recent research and findings. Seminars are generally available online live using a virtual Adobe Connect seminar room. The recordings created may also be made available after the event, at the discretion of the speaker.

    Read more...

    ascilite just announced its 2012 Webinar series program. This year it has a range of presentations on various research approaches in eLearning. Peter Goodyear and I will be co-presenting the last Webinar "ICT-enhanced social and educational research methods", Thursday, 11 October 2012, 1pm NSW time.

    Read more...

    On Wednesday many people attended our farewell lunch for Nino and Sanghee - We were treated to foods from around the world. Nino has recently submitted his PhD thesis and will be returning home to Indonesia. We will miss Nino and wish him all the best. Sanghee has been visiting CoCo from the Department of Medical Education at the School of Medicine in Kyungpook National University, in Daegu Korea. Sanghee has offered valuable insight into e-learning and problem based learning in medical education over the past few months. We wish her all the best.

    About the Blog

    Research by the University's Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI).
    More