« Pilbara language dictionaries - free, interactive and downloadable | Blog home | On technology training in the speaker community - Andrea L. Berez »

business learning training articles new learning business training opportunities finance learning training deposit money learning making training art loan learning training deposits make learning your training home good income learning outcome training issue medicine learning training drugs market learning money training trends self learning roof training repairing market learning training online secure skin learning training tools wedding learning training jewellery newspaper learning for training magazine geo learning training places business learning training design Car learning and training Jips production learning training business ladies learning cosmetics training sector sport learning and training fat burn vat learning insurance training price fitness learning training program furniture learning at training home which learning insurance training firms new learning devoloping training technology healthy learning training nutrition dress learning training up company learning training income insurance learning and training life dream learning training home create learning new training business individual learning loan training form cooking learning training ingredients which learning firms training is good choosing learning most training efficient business comment learning on training goods technology learning training business secret learning of training business company learning training redirects credits learning in training business guide learning for training business cheap learning insurance training tips selling learning training abroad protein learning training diets improve learning your training home security learning training importance

[Update! See the comments! Darkness is lightened! How I overlooked Nick Thieberger's QE2 I don't know, but it is FANTASTIC news for PARADISEC! And on the computational linguistics side, good about Tim Baldwin's project]

It's Poverty Action Day. Whaddya know, speakers of small endangered languages are usually the poorest of the poor, and often don't have the time/money to work on their own languages. That work gets done in partnerships with linguists and others from rich countries like Australia. No joy for this in the Australian Research Council funding results. This must be the worst year for funding endangered language work for a very very long time. (I whinged in 2006 about the ARC lottery results - but that was a FAR better year).

After wading through piles of .pdfs, I could only spot two grants for endangered language work - both for work on new languages in the Northern Territory, [plug! stemming in part from the Aboriginal Child Language Acquisition Project]. Congratulations to

  • Caroline Jones, (based at the University of Wollongong) Phonological development in child speakers of mixed language
  • Felicity Meakins (based at the University of Queensland) Life after death: Exploring the birth of Gurindji Kriol, a new Aboriginal mixed language.

Also connected to Indigenous languages and cultures are:

  • PARADISEC's Linda Barwick, who is a CI on a Linkage grant (Sustainable futures for music cultures: Toward an ecology of musical diversity [.pdf], first CI Prof Dr H Schippers, Griffith University)
  • Paul Burke's ANU anthropology project Indigenous Diaspora: a new direction in the ethnographic study of the migration of Australian Aboriginal people from remote areas. Dead relevant to the Intervention...


Please lighten my gloom by noting if I've missed any projects of direct relevance to Transient Languages readers.


Here are the descriptions of the projects mentioned above:

Caroline Jones: Phonological development in child speakers of mixed language
In Northern Territory Aboriginal communities where traditional languages are mostly spoken fluently by older people, the home language for many children is a kind of mixed language combining elements of traditional languages, Kriol and English. This project will document for the first time the sound system of this language, and investigate how children's background knowledge of this sound system prepares them to learn words in English and traditional languages. This information is important because it can help parents, teachers and speech pathologists assess and teach Aboriginal children from mixed language backgrounds.

Felicity Meakins: Life after death: Exploring the birth of Gurindji Kriol, a new Aboriginal mixed language.
Considerable attention is currently being directed towards the problems faced by Indigenous people living in remote communities. Just how best to help the younger generations emerge from the cycle of poor health and education standards is the topic of many debates in contemporary Australian society and politics. This project addresses the issue of what it is to be a modern Indigenous person and how this identity is expressed linguistically. In understanding more clearly what it means to be a modern Indigenous person, communication channels between mainstream Australia and Indigenous communities can be improved.

Prof Dr H Schippers; Dr P Dunbar-Hall; Prof PR Hayward; A/Prof LM Barwick; Prof K Howard;
Prof P Campbell; Prof J Drummond; Dr H Lundstrom; Dr RA Letts
Sustainable futures for music cultures: Toward an ecology of musical diversity
The project will contribute to a vibrant and diverse musical life in Australia, and by extension the sense of wellbeing of its population. Further, it has the potential to substantially contribute to Australia's reputation as an innovative, forward looking nation by taking the lead in the emerging sub-discipline of applied ethnomusicology. Finally, from the perspective of the National Research Priorities, the project will contribute to fostering understanding between cultures in Australia and the region by increasing insight into the working of other cultures, focusing on the Asia-Pacific.

Also connected to Indigenous languages and cultures is Paul Burke's ANU anthropology project Indigenous Diaspora: a new direction in the ethnographic study of the migration of
Australian Aboriginal people from remote areas
.
This project relates directly to current policy debates about the future of Aboriginal populations in remote Australia and proposals for encouraging mobility between homeland centres and distant jobs and education. It seeks to understand the process and the social and cultural implications of the urbanisation of remote Aboriginal people. As such, it addresses the priority goal of understanding and strengthening Australia's social and economic fabric to help families and individuals lead healthy, productive and fulfilling lives (Research Priority 2). It will also provide a model for the extension of existing anthropological research on remote Aboriginal communities.

Comments

There's this one at Melbourne Uni:
Dr NA Thieberger; Dr R Nordlinger

Doing great things with small languages: Safeguarding Indigenous language material of Australia's region by clever use of new technology.

This project will provide a responsible record of Indigenous and endangered languages from both Australia and from Vanuatu. It will build understanding of the cultures in which those languages are spoken and enhance links between Australia and its neighbours by providing access to field recordings made by researchers since the 1950s, thus enhancing Australia's security. It will also keep Australia at the forefront of the application of new technologies to linguistic research by developing a methodology for language documentation of significance for the discipline as a whole.

Congratulations to the successful applicants! I noted two successful applications at unimelb which you might have missed, Jane:

(which might also be the only two linguistics ARC grants at unimelb this year?)

Dr Tim Baldwin and Assoc Prof Stephen Bird's successful application is entitled "Online linguistic exploration: deeper, faster, broader language documentation".

Dr Nick Thieberger and Dr Rachel Nordlinger's successful application is entitled "Doing great things with small languages: Safeguarding Indigenous language material of Australia's region by clever use of new technology".

So, perhaps it's all about e-research in language documentation?

Jane - you missed two projects at University of Melbourne, including a QEII Fellowship for ELAC blog contributor Nick Thieberger (loud applause!!):

DP0984419 Dr NA Thieberger; Dr R Nordlinger

Project Title Doing great things with small languages: Safeguarding Indigenous language material of Australia's region by clever use of new technology

2009 : $ 122,000
2010 : $ 150,000
2011 : $ 155,000
2012 : $ 167,000
2013 : $ 125,000

QEII Dr NA Thieberger, The University of Melbourne

Project Summary

This project will provide a responsible record of Indigenous and endangered languages from both Australia and from Vanuatu. It will build understanding of the cultures in which those languages are spoken and enhance links between Australia and its neighbours by providing access to field recordings made by researchers since the 1950s, thus enhancing Australia's security. It will also keep Australia at the forefront of the application of new technologies to linguistic research by developing a methodology for language documentation of significance for the discipline as a whole.


There is also this one:

DP0988242 Dr TJ Baldwin; A/Prof S Bird, The University of Melbourne

Project Title Online linguistic exploration: deeper, faster, broader language documentation

2009 : $ 57,000
2010 : $ 59,000
2011 : $ 60,000

Project Summary

This project will develop a new online mode for collaborative linguistic research. Linguists will be able to harness the power of natural language processing techniques for their study of the world's languages. A demonstration system will be developed, permitting linguists to locate examples of syntactic constructions in a large database of parsed text, and to explore similarities across different languages. The project will also encompass a selection of minority languages for which only a small amount of data is available.

Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

Enter the code shown below before pressing post

The Authors

About the Blog

The Transient Building, symbolising the impermanence of language, houses both the Linguistics Department at Sydney University and PARADISEC, a digital archive for endangered Pacific languages and music.
More

FAQ

Papua New Guinea FAQs from Eva Lindstrom Papua New Guinea (New Ireland): Eva Lindstrom's tips for fieldworkers

Australian Languages Answers to some frequently asked questions about Australian languages

Papua Web Information network on Papua, Indonesia (formerly Irian Jaya)

Hibernating blogs

Indigenous Language SPEAK

Langguj gel Australian linguistics and fieldwork blog

Interesting Blogs

Omniglot Writing systems and languages of the world

LingFormant Linguistics news

Language hat Linguistics news and commentary

Jabal al-Lughat Linguistics news and commentary on a range of languages

Living languages Blog with news items and discussion of endangered languages

OzPapersOnline Notices of recent work on the Indigenous languages of Australia

That Munanga linguist Community linguist blog

Anggarrgoon Claire Bowern's linguistics and fieldwork blog

Savage Minds A group blog on Anthropology

Fully (sic)

Language on the Move Intercultural communication and multilingualism

Talking Alaska: Reflections on the native languages of Alaska

Culture matters: applying anthropology Australian anthropology blog: postgraduates and staff

Long Road ethnography and anthropology blog - including about Australia

matjjin-nehen Blog on Australian linguistics, fieldwork, politics and the environment.

Language Log Group blog on language and linguistics

Links

E-MELD The E-MELD School of Best Practices in Digital Language Documentation

Tema Modersmål Website in Swedish with links to sites on and in many languages

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project: Language Documentation: What is it? Information on equipment, formats, and archiving, and examples of documentation

Indigenous Peoples Issues & Resources a worldwide network of organizations, academics, activists, indigenous groups, and others representing indigenous and tribal peoples

Technorati Profile

Technology-enhanced language revitalization Include ILAT (Indigenous Languages and Technology) discussion list.

Endangered languages of Indigenous Peoples of Siberia

Koryak Net Information on the people of Kamchatka

Linguistic fieldwork preparation: a guide for field linguists syllabi, funding, technology, ethics, readings, bibliography

On-line resources for endangered languages

Papua New Guinea Language Resources Phonologies, grammars, dictionaries, literacy, language maps for many PNG languages

Resource network for linguistic diversity Networking practitioners working to record,retrieve & reintroduce endangered languages

Projects

ACLA child language acquisition in three Australian Aboriginal communities

DELAMAN The Digital Endangered Languages and Musics Archives Network

PARADISEC The Pacific And Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures

Murriny-Patha Song Project Documenting the language and music of public songs and dances composed and performed by Murriny Patha-speaking people

PFED The Project for Free Electronic Dictionaries

DOBES Endangered language documentation and archiving, funded by the Volkswagen Foundation and sponsored by the Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen.

DELP Documenting endangered languages at the University of Sydney

Ethno EResearch Exploring methods and technology for streaming media and interlinear text