The Statewide Outreach Perinatal Service for Mental Health (SwOPS-mh), NSW Ministry of Health, has partnered with the Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, to present a series of free webinars on emerging perinatal mental health issues from 2 April 2014 to 16 April 2014.

The SwOPS-mh, funded by the Mental Health and Drug & Alcohol Office (MHDAO), is a tertiary level state wide outreach perinatal psychiatry service, caring for women who are living in rural areas and who are suffering from moderate to severe mental health problems during pregnancy and/or in the first postnatal year.

In this series, perinatal mental health experts from the University of Sydney and NSW Health will give you the latest information about counselling, psychosis, attachment practice and medication.
Webinar timetable

Please click the relevant links below to register to attend the webinars. Registration is free, but each webinar has a limit of 100 participants, so please secure your place early to avoid disappointment. You will receive your personalised login link upon registration.

Pre-Conception Counselling & Perinatal Depression and Anxiety
Wed 2 Apr 2014 11am - 12pm
Professor Philip Boyce and Dr Amanda Bray
Register now: http://bit.ly/1i6Zg37

Perinatal Psychosis
Fri 4 Apr 2014 2pm - 2.30pm
Professor Philip Boyce
Register now: http://bit.ly/2Wt83

Attachment Theory and Practice
Fri 11 Apr 2014 12pm - 12.30pm
Dr Ian Thorburn
Register now: http://bit.ly/1fcs0ci

Perinatal Depression and Fathers & Medication in Pregnancy and Breast Feeding
Wed 16 Apr 2014 2pm - 3pm
Joanne Robinson and Professor Philip Boyce
Register now: http://bit.ly/1hakR

Technical support: If you experience technical difficulties during any webinar sessions, please call toll free number 1800 105 054 (option 2 and then option 1) for technical support.

Acknowledgement: This webinar series is funded by the Statewide Outreach Perinatal Service for Mental Health (SwOPS-mh), NSW Ministry of Health.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

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Interpersonal Psychotherapy is an empirically validated treatment for a variety of psychiatric disorders. The evidence for IPT supports its use for a variety of affective disorders, anxiety disorders, and eating disorders, and for a wide range of patients from children and adolescents to the elderly.

IPT is recognised as an efficacious psychotherapy by the American Psychiatric Association, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK, and the International Cochrane Collaboration. It is also recognised by the Australian healthcare system. There are now over 250 empirical studies supporting the efficacy and effectiveness of IPT.

IPT is a time-limited psychotherapy that focuses on interpersonal issues, which are understood to be a factor in the genesis and maintenance of psychological distress. Interpersonal foci include grief and loss, interpersonal disputes, and role transitions, making IPT suitable for a wide range of problems. The targets of IPT are symptom resolution, improved interpersonal functioning, and increased social support. Typical courses of IPT range from 6-20 sessions with provision for maintenance treatment as necessary.

Watch an interview with internationally acclaimed IPT expert Professor Scott Stuart on a global look at interpersonal psychotherapy at the WorldCanvass 2013:

Want to learn more about Interpersonal Psychotherapy? Join us for a 2-day introductory training session at the University of Sydney on 6-7 March 2014 and learn how to conduct a course of IPT.

For more information, visit http://cce.sydney.edu.au/course/ipta or call +61 2 8999 9608.

Contact course coordinator Richard He if you have any questions.

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Mood disorders carry with them considerable distress and disability; they are one of major contributors to global disability. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that many persons suffering from depression do not have the disorder recognised or have treatment. The introduction of effective, safe and easy to prescribe antidepressants in the 1990s, along with brief, manualised psychological treatments encouraged approaches to meet the ‘unmet need’ Public health approaches have been used to increase the recognition of depression and allow depressed persons to be able to access treatments. The DSM diagnostic criteria (with its low threshold for diagnosis) and the use of screening questionnaires have contributed to a new problem of ‘overdiagnosing’ depression often referred to as ‘pathologising’ sadness. The early recognition of bipolar disorder is another major issue as there is often a delay of 5-7 years from the mood episode (usually depression) before a diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made. Over diagnosis is also a problem with bipolar disorder, especially bipolar II disorder, with online screening tools contributing to this problem.

Join us for a webinar presented by Professor Philip Boyce and learn more about the problem of mood disorders.

Time: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM AEST (UCT+10)

Registration: Registration is free. Please click here to secure your spot. Instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you upon registration. Technical support is available on 1800 194 319.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

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Join us for a webinar presented by guest speaker Dr Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne. This presentation highlights some of the current evidence for some key antidepressant nutraceutical complementary medicines in the treatment of mood disorders. The specific complementary medicines covered are: Omega-3, S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAMe), N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), Zinc, and St John’s wort. In addition to current evidence being discussed, clinical considerations (safety, quality issues and dosage) are also detailed.

Time: Wed, 16 Oct 2013 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM EST (UCT +10)

Registration:
Registration is free. Please click here to secure your spot. Instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you upon registration. Technical support is available on 1800 194 319.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

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Dysthymic disorder is a chronic, often lifelong, low-grade depressive syndrome. Its sufferers lives are empty of enjoyment and sense of purpose; they feel little sense of reward from any normally pleasurable activity or achievement. There are many possible causes of dysthymia, including genetic and other biological associations, as well as antecedents based on cognitive schemata and problematic attachment styles. Many people with dysthymia present to primary practice complaining of chronic unhappiness, or of one of dysthymia’s many comorbidities. They often appear preoccupied with their own failings and perceived inadequacies, even when their life accomplishments are above the average. Their relationships are unsatisfying, and their work lives unrewarding.

In the face of what can appear to be simply a gloomy personality, therapeutic pessimism is common but, fortunately, not necessarily justified. Several treatments, including both medications and psychotherapeutic interventions, have been shown to help. This webinar will discuss the symptoms of dysthymia, its prevalence, possible causes and theoretical underpinnings, and how best to manage it.

Join us for a webinar presented by Dr Amanda Bray and learn the symptoms of dysthymia, its prevalence, possible causes and theoretical underpinnings, and how best to manage it.

Time: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM EST (UCT +10)

Registration: Registration is free. Please click here to secure your spot. Instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you upon registration. Technical support is available on 1800 194 319.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

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Telepsychiatry has been practiced for over 50 years, and is as effective diagnostically and therapeutically as in-person psychiatry. A variety of telemedicine and professional clinical guidelines are available and patients are generally highly satisfied and responsive. Web/Cloud based video technologies are widely available, cheap and of high quality. The only absolute clinical exclusions are refusal or actual physical dangerousness – otherwise any patient with a mental health disorder can be seen. Some groups of patients prefer being seen on video than in person – children, anxious, paranoid, physically disabled, geographically distant. Asynchronous telepsychiatry is being developed and eventually a variety of hybrid approaches will occur in most psychiatrists practices.

Join us for a webinar presented by guest speaker Professor Peter Yellowlees from University of California, Davis, United States of America, and learn practical requirements to see patients with Mood Disorders using videoconferencing technologies and how to integrate telepsychiatry into the typical psychiatric inperson practice.

Time: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 11:00 AM - 11:30 PM EST (UCT +10)

Registration: Registration is free. Please click here to secure your spot. Instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you upon registration. Technical support is available on 1800 194 319.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

0 comments |

Globally, the gap between need for and receipt of treatment for mental disorders, including alcohol/other drug dependence, is wide. This is especially true for non-pharmacological treatments such as counseling, which is often preferred by many patients. Advances in technology have meant that computers and the Internet are highly accessible, and capable of providing evidence-based psychological interventions to people with mental disorders with high fidelity. Despite this potential, many questions remain about the efficacy of computerised/Internet-delivered treatments for mental disorders, particularly when offered in isolation of clinical supervision and monitoring.

Join us for a webinar presented by guest speaker Dr Frances Kay-Lambkin from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at University of New South Wales, and explore the evidence for the real-world effectiveness of computerised/Internet delivered treatment with special reference to the treatment of co-occurring mood and alcohol/other drug use problems.

Time: Fri 20 Sep 2013 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM AEST (UCT +10)

Registration: Registration is free. Please click here to secure your spot. Instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you upon registration. Technical support is available on 1800 194 319.

Contact:
Richard He | Program Manager - Mental Health Education
T +61 2 9845 7798
E richard.he@sydney.edu.au

0 comments |