Join us on 27 May for Building better universities, a Research on Learning and Educational Innovation seminar with Jos Boys.

This seminar starts from the belief that we have reached a key moment for the tertiary-education sector, where the services, location, scale, ownership, and distinctiveness of education are being altered dramatically, whether universities and colleges want it or not. Higher education faces many challenges, including marketisation, internationalisation and the impact of new technologies. Most crucially, these shifts are affecting traditional assumptions about the ‘proper shape’ of higher-education institutions, its teaching and learning practices and the roles of – and relationships between – learners, teachers, researchers, managers, businesses and communities.

At the same time, many universities are developing responses to this changing world. What, then, can we learn from such initiatives – both large and small – in university and college provision across the globe? How can they help us think critically, constructively and creatively about alternative learning and teaching frameworks and practices in our own institutions? This seminar, based on Jos's most recent publication, Building Better Universities: Strategies, Spaces, Technologies (Routledge 2015), offers participants the opportunity to discuss the implications of contemporary change on institutional ‘shape’ and on curriculum design and delivery.


Jos Boys is an academic developer with the Learning and Teaching Unit of the School of Education at the University of New South Wales. She has a background in architecture and design, and has worked across many institutions as an academic, researcher and in curriculum design and development. Jos was employed as a research fellow in learning spaces at the University of Brighton, UK, and has several publications in this area, including Towards Creative Learning Spaces: Re-thinking the Architecture of Post-compulsory Education (2011).

When: 27 May, 11am–12.30pm
Where: Room 612, Education Building A35
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/
More information here

Join us on 20 May for "Modelling complex learning spaces", a Research on Learning and Education Innovation seminar, with Director of eLearning Associate Professor Rob Ellis and Professor of Education Peter Goodyear.

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Universities and schools are spending billions of dollars each year creating new kinds of learning spaces, without much evidence to connect built form to educational outcomes. In this talk, we will share some foundational ideas from our new ARC-funded project "Modelling complex learning spaces". This project has a number of aims including discovering how designers of new spaces are able to make use of research evidence in their design processes and how to combine observational and experiential data about space and learning into actionable knowledge for the many people who (re)configure space for learning.

We are interested in the implications of this knowledge in supporting teaching staff in their design of, and teaching in, complex learning spaces, as well as how physical and digital spaces interweave and how network and spatial framings of educational phenomena may be integrated.

When: 11am–12.30pm (arrive 10.45am for refreshments)
Where: Room 612, Education Building A35
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/.
More information available here.

Our 13 May seminar is "Design for learning: communities and flexible design processes" with Davinia Hernández-Leo.

davinia100.jpgDavinia Hernández-Leo is Associate Professor in the Department of Information and Communications Technologies at Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona (UPF), the coordinator of the Learning Technologies section of the Interactive Technologies Group (gti.upf.edu), Vice-Dean of the UPF ICT-Engineering School and the head of its unit for teaching quality and innovation.

In this seminar Davinia will present a short overview of the Learning Technologies research that we are carrying out at the ICT department of Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. Focusing on the results the METIS European project, which aims at promoting the adoption of design approaches enabling educators to act as (co-)designers of sound (technology-supported) learning activities, she will in particular introduce the Integrated Learning Design Environment (ILDE).

ILDE is a community environment that integrates co-design support for educator communities; learning design editors following different authoring and pedagogical approaches; interface for deployment of designs on mainstream Virtual Learning Environments. ILDE has been used in a variety of community contexts, each of them applying different design processes supported by combinations of selected tools integrated in ILDE.

When: May 13, 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Room 612 in the Education Building A35
More information available here
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/.

Analysing online and place-based spaces for networked learning, a Research on Learning and Educational Innovation seminar with Lucila Carvalho.

Lucila.jpgMost research in networked learning has been in higher education and in workplace settings. As technology evolves and becomes more pervasive, and new mobile devices, media habits and social networking practices emerge, attention to other types of (formal and informal) spaces for networked learning becomes necessary. There is also an increased need for analytical tools to support educational designers cope with the complexity of these emerging assemblages of people, things, ideas and experiences.

This seminar discusses analysis and design for networked learning, presenting some of the ideas in The Architecture of Productive Learning Networks (Carvalho & Goodyear 2014), and work developed in the Laureate Program of Professor Peter Goodyear. It illustrates how the activity-centered analysis and design (ACAD) framework was used as the basis for analysing relations between the educational design and the activity of participants in three very distinct learning networks. The three examples comprise one formal and two informal

Lucila Carvalho is a postdoctoral research associate in the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) at the University of Sydney. She works on Professor Peter Goodyear’s Laureate Fellowship program: "Learning, technology and design: architectures for productive networked learning". She has presented her work at various international conferences in the fields of education, sociology, systemic functional linguistics, design and software engineering. She was co-editor of The Architecture of Productive Learning Networks (Routledge, 2014) and the forthcoming book Place-based Spaces for Networked Learning.

When: May 6, 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Room 612 in the Education Building A35
More information available here
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/.

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation seminar with Roberto Martinez-Maldonado. Note change of venue to room 221 for this seminar only.

This seminar fuses research on CSCL and collaborative design for learning. It reports a study located in a novel multi-surface environment, configured to support small teams who are designing for other people’s learning. From observational and interview data, we show how collaborative design for learning needs to be understood as a complex, multiply-situated activity, in which design problem-solving, tools and space usage depend on the fluent deployment of intuitive knowledge about mutual awareness, shared perception, information persistence and movement.

Roberto267.jpegRoberto Martinez-Maldonado is a postdoctoral research associate on the ARC Laureate Fellowship at CoCo. He finished his PhD in 2014 in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group (CHAI) at the University of Sydney. His research area is Human-Computer Interaction, with a particular emphasis on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Educational Data Mining. His research interests are broad and varied.

When: April 29, 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Design Studio, room 221 (note change of venue for this week's seminar only) in the Education Building A35
More information available here

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday seminar with Dr Boris Handal.

Dr Boris Handal is an associate professor in educational technologies at the University of Notre Dame Australia. He has taught in schools and universities for over thirty years in Australia, Asia and Latin America. Last year he was invited as a Visiting Professor by the University of Alberta to study the implementation of digital technologies in schools in North America.

During 2014 Boris visited thirty educational sites and interviewed over 100 eminent teachers, principals, district superintendents and academics in the United States, Canada and Australia countries to study the implementation of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets in teaching and learning. During that period evidence and exemplars on issues that currently challenge educators worldwide such as modern pedagogies, digital citizenship, institutional change, equity and professional learning were collected. His upcoming book “Mobile Makes Learning Free” provides new conceptual frameworks to understand best practice in the field of mobile learning.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm (arrive at 10.45am for refreshments)
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
This seminar will be live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/
More information at http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/implementing-mobile-learning-in-schools.

A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday Seminar with David Ashe.

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When students are asked to think about aspects of ‘sustainability’ they are required not only to understand scientific facts but also to consider that they are both part of the 'problem' and part of the 'solution'. These issues are inherently ill-structured; that is, they may have many viable alternative solutions and it can be difficult to know when a satisfactory solution has been reached. This seminar presents a PhD study that investigated upper primary school students knowledge and thinking as they considered issues related to sustainability. The study focused on how knowledge was used across different contexts and draws conclusions about the use of ‘epistemic challenges’ as a pedagogical tool.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
Arrive at 10.45am for refreshment
More information at Epistemic challenges in inquiry science.

David Ashe is a member of the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. He has just competed his PhD and currently works as part of a team of researchers investigating how to design better tools and resources for networked online learning.

This seminar is one of our regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Seminars: the Wednesday Seminars (formerly the CoCo/STL seminars) this year. Please note our new location is room 612. More information is available on our website.


A Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday Seminar with Kate Thompson and Pippa Yeoman.

As the collection of ‘big data’ (in terms of both depth and breadth) becomes more common, it will become increasingly important to adopt methods for sharing data, analysing common datasets, and making comparisons across studies. In this study of high-school students engaged in a collaborative design task about a local environmental issue, we adopted a multimodal approach, which allowed us to untangle the interplay of epistemic and social activity, negotiation of tools, and the physical and digital setting that typify such environments, allowing us to find explanations for the very different achievements of the learners. Researchers often lack the language to properly convey the activity observed in complex learning environments. We have begun to do this in a way that respects the design of the task, can be related to the learning outcomes, and gives value to the activity of the learners.

When: 11.00am - 12.30pm
Where: Education Building A35, Room 612
Arrive at 10.45am for refreshment
More information at A multimodal method for analysing complex learning environment

This is the second of the regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Seminars: the Wednesday Seminars (formerly the CoCo/STL seminars) this year. Please note our new location is room 612. More information is available on our website.


The 2014 Research Fest plenary, "Learning Analytics: Critical Issues", with Professor Simon Buckingham Shum is now available to view online on YouTube.

Education is about to experience a data tsunami from online trace data (VLEs; MOOCs; Quantified Self) integrated with conventional educational datasets. This requires new kinds of analytics to make sense of this new resource, which in turn asks us to reflect deeply on what kinds of learning we value. We can choose to know more than ever about learners and teachers, but like any modelling technology or accounting system, analytics do not passively describe sociotechnical reality: they begin to shape it. What realities do we want analytics to perpetuate, or bring into being? Can we talk about analytics in the same breath as the deepest values that a wholistic educational experience should nurture? Could analytics become an ally for those who want to shift assessment regimes towards valuing the qualities that many now regard as critical to thriving in the ‘age of complexity’?

The annual STL Research Fest took place on Thursday November 6th in the Education Building (A35) at the University of Sydney. The Fest was opened by Professor Pip Pattison, DVC Education, University of Sydney, and closed with an invited lecture from Professor Simon Buckingham-Shum, Professor of Learning Informatics and Director of the Connected Intelligence Centre at UTS. Slides of the keynote and some of the posters displayed are available online at http://bit.ly/STLFest14files.

26 March - Neuroscience and Development: Implications for Education and Training with Professor Ian Hickie.
A special guest lecture co-presented by the Neuroscience & Education Special Interest Group and the STL Network.

Hickey100.jpgDiscoveries in neuroscience about how the brain develops, learns, and remembers will increasingly impact the study of education, and the processes of learning and teaching in schools. In this talk Professor Ian Hickie, Executive Director of the Brain & Mind Research Institute, will consider what has been discovered over the past ten years or so and where we may be heading.

This lecture will be of particular interest to teachers, early-childhood educators, teacher educators, and parents who want to know what is being learned about children’s brains, and how that new knowledge can improve the way we teach and interact with children in schools and at home.

When: 4.00 to 5.15pm
Where: Education Lecture Theatre 351, the University of Sydney
More information: http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/news_events/events/2015/Semester-One/neuroscience-development.shtml

Our series of regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Wednesday Seminars (formerly the STL/CoCo seminars) restart on Apr 1 when David Boud discusses the changing face of feedback research. See below for more information on this event and for our four other seminars in April, all of which are now in their new home in room 612 of the Education Building.

1 APR - David Boud || The changing face of feedback research

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Have we finally found a way for feedback research to make a difference to learning? Feedback is the single aspect of higher-education courses most criticised by students across countries and across disciplines. There have been many institutional attempts to improve this situation, but with little effect. In recent years though feedback has become a focus for educational researchers and new ways of formulating the challenge of feedback have been developed.

The focus of this seminar will changes occurring in the way feedback is conceptualised, and the implications of these changes for assessment practices. Not surprisingly, a key element of this is a renewed emphasis on designing learning activities as if feedback were important.

This is the first of the regular Research on Learning and Educational Innovation Seminars: the Wednesday Seminars (formerly the CoCo/STL seminars) this year. Please note our new location is room 612. They take place most Wednesdays in semester from 11.00 in room 612 of the Education Building. No RSVP or registration is needed, just come along. More information is available on our website.

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This research on learning spaces seminar explores how and why attention to the provision of intimate spaces such as quiet rooms, sitting rooms, bedrooms and child-sized openings was seen as indicative of best practice in the design of schools in the middle decades of the twentieth century.

This event is a research on learning spaces seminar, hosted by Dr Helen Proctor of the Faculty of Education and Social Work and the Sciences and Technologies of Learning (STL) network. Dr Catherine Burke is a Reader in the History of Childhood and Education at the University of Cambridge, UK. She is an historian currently exploring cultural and material histories of education and childhood in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

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This event is the first of this year's “Research on Learning and Educational Innovation: the Wednesday Seminars”, organised jointly by CoCo and STL at the Faculty of Education and Social Work, and hosted on Wednesdays during semester in Room 612 of the Education Building.

damsa-small.jpgIn this seminar, Dr Damsa will attempt to clarify the notion of shared epistemic agency and to illustrate how it is expressed and achieved by undergraduate students in the context of learning through collaborative knowledge construction. Building on works from learning sciences, educational psychology and sociology, shared epistemic agency is defined as a capacity that enables groups to carry out joint activities of knowledge construction that lead to a shared outcome. Two studies examining group projects learning activities in undergraduate courses in teacher education and computer engineering are used to illustrate how it is expressed and analysed in educational settings.

The discussion foregrounds that agency is not something given and should not be taken for granted; it emerges and is achieved in and through the unfolding (co-)construction processes and meaningful participation in activities. In addition, it highlights that creating the premises for the emergence of shared epistemic agency is an effort that can be assigned both to individuals and groups, but also to how the (pedagogical, structural) context facilitates this process.

Dr Crina Damsa is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oslo (UiO), where she is also a member of the teaching staff in the Higher Education master program. Dr Damsa is an active member of the Learning Sciences community and of the European Association for Research of Learning and Instruction.

  • Where: Education Building (A35) Room 612
  • When: 11.00am - 12.30pm (arrive at 10.45am for refreshments)
  • This seminar will be available live online at http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/seminar-room2/.
  • More information available here.

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In 1973, when the doors were first opened to the Sydney Opera House, most people had never heard of a “digital experience”. Since then we’ve watched digital devices make their way into every detail of our lives from business to exercise, health, politics, friendships, and romance. They are now continuous players in our moment-by-moment lived experience and the future “Internet of Things” promises little separation between digital and non-digital experience at all. But one critical question remains…

Are we any happier?

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Several of our researchers have submitted papers to this year's international Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL. The conference will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from June 7th to 11th, 2015.

STL submissions include:


  • Poster: How Collaborative Successes and Failures Become Productive: An Exploration of Emerging Understanding and Misunderstanding Turning Points in Model-based Learning with Productive Failure. Authors: Alisha Portolese, Lina Markauskaite, Polly Lai, Michael Jacobson

  • Poster: Measuring group progress through a complex computer-supported design task: Identifying the effects of scaffolds on the processes of learning. Author: Kate Thompson

  • Paper: Learning about Collaborative Design for Learning in a Multi-Surface Design Studio. Authors: Roberto Martinez-Maldonado, Peter Goodyear, Yannis Dimitriadis (University of Valladolid), Kate Thompson, Lucila Carvalho, Luis Pablo Prieto (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne), Martin Parisio

  • Paper: Socio-material Representation of Group Knowledge Creation. Author: Natalie Spence

  • Symposium: A multimodal approach to the analysis of complex collaborative learning environments: Using complementary methods of analysis to synthesise new trends in scaffolding research.
    Kate Thompson, Lucila Carvalho, Maryam Khosronejad, Peter Reimann, Dewa Wardak, Peter Goodyear, Roberto Martinez-Maldonado, The University of Sydney; Anindito Aditomo, University of Sydney and The University of Surabaya, Indonesia; Michael A. Evans, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Counselor Education, North Carolina State University; Yannis Dimitriadis, Universidad de Valladolid; and Gregory Dyke, ICAR, University of Lyon/CNRS, France.

  • Symposium: Researching and Designing for the Orchestration of Learning in the CSCL Classroom.
    Emma Mercier (chair), University of Illinois; Cresencia Fong, University of Toronto; Karin Forssell, Stanford University; Maya Israel, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Andrew Joyce-Gibbons, Durham University; Roberto Martinez-Maldonado, University of Sydney; Saadeddine Shehab, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Nikol Rummel (discussant), Ruhr-Universitat Bochum; James D. Slotta, University of Toronto.

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Forbes (US) recently mentioned research by Rafael Calvo and Dorian Peters in a piece titled: '“Positive Computing: The Next Big Thing In Human-Centered Design?"'

"It’s a call to action that Calvo and Peters are delivering to a wider audience, not just the innovators working under the shadows of Hangar One. And they are delivering it at a time when technologists have a big opportunity to rethink their approach to design. A new era of computing — wearable, integrated, ubiquitous — is fast approaching. Will it be good or bad for our wellness? If you believe in human agency, then the call to action is real. There’s no time like today to plan for a future in which we can thrive, and not be the victims of our own design."

The article is available online here.

Professor Rafael Calvo, from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, and Dorian Peters, from the Faculty of Education and Social Work, have just published a book: Positive Computing: Technology for Wellbeing and Human Potential. They also run a blog called Positive Computing at http://www.positivecomputing.org/

The International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS) have just announced the upload of three more videos related to their NAPLeS webinar video series.

The three videos with Professor Sten Ludvigsen, University of Oslo discussing workplace learning with digital resources are now available online and can be accessed here: http://isls-naples.psy.lmu.de/intro/all-webinars/ludvigsen_all/index.html.

The whole collection of the recently uploaded HD videos can be found here:
http://isls-naples.psy.lmu.de/video-resources/guided-tour/index.html
http://isls-naples.psy.lmu.de/video-resources/interviews-ls/index.html

Each NAPLeS video involves a 5-minutes “teaser” and a 15-minutes HD video from a different lecturer.
Our various postgraduate study opportunities, including research degrees at the Masters and PhD levels and our coursework Masters in the Learning Sciences and Technology (MLS&T), at the CoCo centre are members of the NAPLES network.

Students who used school-issued laptop computers at school and home perform better in their HSC science exams than those not given the computers, recent research from the University of Sydney has shown.

"While improvements are small to medium they are statistically significant, particularly in the context of highly competitive HSC exams where a margin of a few marks can affect a student's future at university or in the job market," said Simon Crook, a PhD candidate in the physics education research group at the University of Sydney and lead author of an article recently published in the International Journal of Science Education.

While there is widespread research on the impact of using laptops on students' motivation, there is a lack of research on their influence on academic achievement, especially for science. This study capitalised on a unique natural experiment created by the staged roll-out of the campaign, the Digital Education Revolution, in which only half of Year 9 NSW students in 2008 received laptops from their schools. In late 2011, when these students sat their HSC examinations half of them had been schooled with their own laptops for more than three years, and half had not. The research looked at the results of 967 science students from 12 high schools in Sydney, in HSC biology, chemistry and physics.

A paper, "An Evaluation of the Impact of 1:1 Laptops on Student Attainment in Senior High School Sciences', has been published in the International Journal of Science Education and also been featured in The Australian (subscribers only). Authors on the article are Simon Crook (lead), STL reseacher Associate Professor Manju Sharma from the School of Physics and Dr Rachel Wilson from the Faculty of Education and Social Work.

You can view the paper here.

Several of our researchers have submitted papers to this year's international Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL. The conference will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from June 7th to 11th, 2015.

STL submissions include:


  • Paper: Inclusive Design for CSCL: The Case of Adult Literacy Learners. Author: Ana Pinto

  • Paper: How Collaborative Successes and Failures Become Productive: An Exploration of Emerging Understanding and Misunderstanding Turning Points in Model-based Learning with Productive Failure. Authors: Alisha Portolese, Lina Markauskaite, Polly Lai, Michael Jacobson

  • Paper: Socio-material Representation of Group Knowledge Creation. Author: Natalie Spence

  • Paper: Measuring group progress through a complex computer-supported design task: Identifying the effects of scaffolds on the processes of learning. Author: Kate Thompson

  • Symposium: A multimodal approach to the analysis of complex collaborative learning environments: Using complementary methods of analysis to synthesise new trends in scaffolding research

The above syposium is organised by Kate Thompson and Lucila Carvalho.

Synthesis research is a method utilized in the field of ecology, and involves bringing together experts in different areas to address a research question that cannot be entirely answered by a single perspective. This symposium explores the application of this model to the learning sciences, specifically to scaffolding of computer supported collaborative learning. The symposium brings together expert researchers (working on different, related perspectives of scaffolding) to discuss their analysis of processes of learning in relation to discursive psychology and gesture analysis; conversation analysis; and multimodal interaction analysis. Each presenter will analyze and discuss the same corpus of data. These streams of data analysis are then brought together in the fourth presentation, with a discussion of visualizing and synthesizing the findings, piecing together an elaborated understanding of scaffolding. The final presentation includes the whole panel and addresses some of the challenges of conducting research this way in the learning sciences.

Participants include:
  • Kate Thompson, Lucila Carvalho, The University of Sydney, CoCo Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia kate.thompson@sydney.edu.au, lucila.carvalho@sydney.edu.au

  • Michael A. Evans, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Counselor Education, North Carolina State University, michael.a.evans@ncsu.edu

  • Maryam Khosronejad, Peter Reimann, CoCo Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia mkho4965@uni.sydney.edu.au, peter.reimann@sydney.edu.au & Anindito Aditomo, CoCo Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia, and The University of Surabaya, Indonesia. aadi4954@uni.sydney.edu.au

  • Dewa Wardak, Peter Goodyear, CoCo Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia dwar9402@uni.sydney.edu.au, peter.goodear@sydney.edu.au

  • Yannis Dimitriadis, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain, yannis@tel.uva.es, Roberto Martinez-Maldonado, CoCo Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia roberto@it.usyd.edu.au, & Gregory Dyke, ICAR, University of Lyon/CNRS, France, gregdyke@gmail.com


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Rich Despite Scale, or Rich Because of Scale? MOOCs, SPOCs, and Residential Education

“When MOOCs "exploded" in 2012, they were all about scale: courses, instructors, and MOOC providers try to outdo each other on how many learners they were reaching. An unsurprising backlash came from the criticism that surely at such scales the learning experience would suffer. One unsurprising reaction to that backlash was the position that MOOC technology could also help better package curricular materials for local customization and reuse, that is, the SPOC model.

Both MOOCs and SPOCs have value, but lost in this discussion is a closer examination of which elements of both MOOCs and campus courses are rich because of scale, and which ones we should strive to make rich despite scale. I will give examples of both, based on both our work with doing research on MOOC data and our attempts to handle exploding demands for CS courses at Berkeley (our introductory CS course now enrolls over 1,000 students, and our upper division advanced courses routinely enroll several hundred).”

Armando Fox is a Professor of Computer Science at UC Berkeley as well as the Faculty Advisor to the UC Berkeley MOOCLab. His current research includes online education and high productivity parallel computing. His current teaching activities focus on undergraduate Software Engineering, for which he and Prof. David Patterson have writtenand is the basis of Berkeley’s first free MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). For more information see http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/it/research/news/armando-fox.shtml

  • Speaker: Professor Armando Fox, Computer Science Division, UC Berkeley MOOCLab

  • When: Tuesday 25 November 2014, 3.30-4.30pm - Note: different day and time to usual.

  • Where: The University of Sydney, School of IT Building, SIT Lecture Theatre (Room 123), Level 1

  • For more information go to the Basser seminar series site

The Basser Seminar Series held at the School of Information Technologies provides an opportunity for IT academics and representatives from industry to present and discuss their current work. The seminars offer a glimpse at the cutting-edge of IT research. For more information see http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/it/research/news/seminars.shtml

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