By Lauren Gui

Lauren Gui and Kate Forsyth.jpg

We are inextricably caught up in the paradox of endless numbered days from the day we are born, but fairytales have endured the test of time. I caught up with Kate Forsyth, a celebrated voice in fairytale retelling and acclaimed novelist of the international bestseller Bitter Greens, to talk about how fairytales resonate with both the young and old with their power to instill courage, and the complexity of good and evil choices.

Read more...

By Swetha Das

13275398_1296495890378994_118482238_o (1).jpg

The intersection between the power of the internet and the prevalence of misogyny has led to the omission of women’s voices in public spaces.

Read more...

By Swetha Das

LifeInWords.jpg

French writer, Jean Cocteau, once said that “the poet doesn’t invent. He listens”.

A poet has countless influences, but for Kate Lilley and Geoffrey Lehmann, their experiences have drawn out the narratives in their work.

Read more...

By Lauren Gui

Jonathan_Franzen.jpg

Jonathan Franzen does not disappoint.

As he takes the stage, Franzen pauses for a few moments to gaze quizzically around the room before wryly addressing the crowd: “This is a grand hall.” Instantly, I take a fond liking to him, especially since Franzen’s sentiments about Twitter beautifully encapsulate my own: “Twitter is unspeakably irritating.”

Read more...

By Angelina Kosev and Tom St John

Baggini_Talk.jpg

The sun is bright, the crowd is plentiful, there are children running around and the sound of what could possibly be a xylophone is wafting out of all the buildings – it is children and family day at the Sydney Writer’s Festival, but I am walking towards the refuge of Julian Baggini’s talk on free will. Perhaps this is a different type of playground (one for the existentialist, the nihilist, or simply the interested; all of whom were spotted here).

Read more...

By Lauren Gui

Sydney.jpg

Cities may burn to the ground, but their bones remain, whispering secrets into the hot dusty breeze.

On a Thursday morning bathed in dazzling sunlight, a packed room tucked away at the end of the pier buzzing in anticipation lowers to an excited murmur. Eleanor Limprecht catches my eye and offers a warm smile and quick wink, picking up on my fruitless attempt to contain my enthusiasm.

Read more...

By Lauren A. Weber

Jacqui_Newling.jpg

I never thought that a talk surrounding cookbooks would involve politics, race, history, and of course food - all at once.

“Our Food History: In Black and White” featuring Jacqui Newling and John Newton embodied all of this juicy stuff, and I also found out that apparently the notorious Australian supervillain also known as the ‘brush turkey’ is a delicious bird that can be baked or seared like duck!

Read more...

The Authors

About the Blog

Everything you ever wanted to know about uni but were too afraid to ask....
More

Categories