In September 2012 a review of the Sydney University Press was undertaken to assess the value and viability of the press. As a result of the review, followed by discussions with senior academics at the University of Sydney, SUP has been undergoing an evolution in order to better support and facilitate the communication of the intellectual and research outputs of the University of Sydney and the Australian research community. The new vision for SUP is to become a leading scholarly publisher in Australia of books that advance knowledge and influence policy while supporting Sydney University’s brand as a research-intensive institution nationally and globally. At the same time, SUP aims to provide an avenue for Australian researchers to communicate their research to other scholars, policy-makers and the general public.

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For the Sake of a Song: Wangga Songmen and their Repertories=

By Katharine Leonarder

I should probably start this entry with a rather embarrassing admission, I know nothing about music. To me the sounds of Taylor Swift are on the same technical scale as those of the Basel Symphony Orchestra. So it was with some trepidation that I agreed to read For the sake of a song: wangga songmen and their repertories and write this blog. Surprisingly enough I found myself enjoying the detailed descriptions of wangga music, even down to the meticulously documented notations of tempo, rhythm and structure, which – I might add – were written in such I way that even I managed to understand them.

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Beyond thalidomide: birth defects explained=

By Dr Janet McCredie AM

Between 1958 and 1962, thousands of babies across the Western world were unaccountably born with a plethora of physical deformities, including short or absent limbs, ears and eyes, holes in the heart, blocked intestines, and/or absence or duplication of other internal organs.

At first glance, longitudinal reduction of limbs was the most obvious feature, but more serious, often lethal defects were hidden in other organs. Vital organs such as the ear, eye, heart, gut, and/or kidney were deformed or completely absent. The perinatal mortality rate of these babies was an alarming 40 percent.

Striking patterns emerged in the geography of this alarming epidemic. West Germany had thousands of deformed babies, while East Germany had none: they simply stopped at the Iron Curtain. Canada had over 150, but the USA had almost none. They stopped at the 49th parallel. Britain had over 400 cases, and the British Commonwealth was afflicted, for example Australia had 46 known cases.

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Photo by Mark Lewis,Radio Pictures, Mullumbimby

By Professor Barney Glover

It is particularly fitting that the launch of Cane toads: a tale of sugar, politics and flawed science by Nigel Turvey coincides with this time in the seasonal calendar of the tropical north of Australia, when the wettest months will soon be upon us, which while bringing respite to many, are those months in which the cane toads are most active.

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Cane toads: a tale of sugar, politics and flawed science=

When cane toads were released in Australia in 1935, they were seen as the latest innovation for biological control of pests in sugar cane. Cane toads were promoted widely by sugar cane scientists but the science was flawed, and these flaws were magnified by the political necessity of supporting the sugar industry. It was the same in the Caribbean, Hawai‘i and Queensland when cane toads were introduced.

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Politics and religion in the new century=

By Monica Purcell

With France becoming the fourteenth nation in the world to legalise same-sex marriage in May this year, rallies have exploded over Australia urging our parliament to do the same. Despite a clear and growing majority in support of same-sex marriage, our government seems unable to comfortably adapt, signalling some level of enduring commitment to the traditional Christian view of marriage. In a fascinating collection of essays titled Politics and religion in the new century (published in 2009) faith is explored practically, rather than theologically, in order to understand religious influence on political and social life.

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Paid care in Australia=

By Jacqui Shilson-Josling

In a recent report by Lateline on the “aged care crisis” in Australia, revelations arose about the quality of care in facilities around the country. Common complaints included “being left in faeces and urine, rough treatment, poor nutrition, inadequate pain relief, verbal abuse, and untreated broken bones and infections”. With accusations of neglect and even abuse in our aged care system, questions arise as to who is best able to provide adequate care for our ageing population. This ongoing discussion is the focus of Debra King and Gabrielle Meagher’s book, Paid care in Australia: politics, profits, practices.

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